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I've tried looking at global, but it only contains variables, not functions. How can I list all the functions created in my script?

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what would be the use case for this? –  mihai May 5 '12 at 20:34
1  
A custom AOP script that I'm creating for a node app. I want to use it for things like profiling, throttling, and custom security policies. I checked out Dojo but had some early probs just loading it into my node app so I thought I'd write a custom script. It shouldn't be that hard. –  Trindaz May 5 '12 at 21:12
    
So you want to do this from within the script itself? I'm not sure it's so easy because you can have anonymous functions, functions inside closures, functions dynamically created etc. –  mihai May 5 '12 at 21:18
    
True - but in my case applying aspects to only 'root level' named functions will surfice. –  Trindaz May 5 '12 at 21:27

5 Answers 5

Run node debug from command line with the file you want to look at. Then you can use list(some big number here)

node debug mini_file_server.js 
< debugger listening on port 5858
connecting... ok
debug> scripts
  26: mini_file_server.js
debug> list(1000)
  1 var http = require('http'),
  2     util = require('util'),
  3     fs   = require('fs');
  4 
  5 server = http.createServer(function(req, res){  
  6     var stream  = fs.createReadStream('one.html'),
  7         stream2 = fs.createReadStream('two.html');
  8     console.log(stream);
  9     console.log(stream2);
 10     stream.on('end', function(){
 11         stream2.pipe(res, { end:false});
 12     });
 13 
 14     stream2.on('end', function(){
 15         res.end("Thats all!");
 16     });
 17 
 18     res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type' : 'text/plain'});
 19     stream.pipe(res, { end:false});
 20     stream2.pipe(res, { end:true});
 21 
 22 }).listen(8001);
 23 });
debug> 
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If the function has a name, it'll show up in global just fine:

mb-work-laptop:~ markbessey$ node
> for (var k in global) { console.log(k); }
global
process
GLOBAL
root
Buffer
setTimeout
setInterval
clearTimeout
clearInterval
console
module
require
k
> function z(a) { return a*10; }
> for (var k in global) { console.log(k); }
global
process
GLOBAL
root
Buffer
setTimeout
setInterval
clearTimeout
clearInterval
console
module
require
k
z
> 
> global.z
[Function: z]
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I could have sworn I'd tested for this and found that functions weren't available in global, but your script works fine for me too. –  Trindaz May 7 '12 at 17:18
    
Sorry Mark I've demarked this as answer - it works fine in the console, but for the script function a(){ return 1; } for(var k in global) console.log(k) it does not show the function 'a'. –  Trindaz May 7 '12 at 17:50
    
Right. As it turns out, in the interactive mode, those definitions go into global, but if you run a script from "node script.js", they end up as locals in the module. There's definitely a way to get at that info from the debugger, but not sure if the script can access it... –  Mark Bessey May 8 '12 at 17:28

This is impossible in node without more advanced reflecting tools like the debugger.

The only way to do this would be to use __parent__ which was removed due to security issues and other things. Like Mark Bessey said, when you run the script those variables become module closure variables. You can not access them elsewhere without explicitly exporting them.

This is not a bug, it's by design. It's just how node works. However, if you just ask your users to write function expression assignments, all would work a-ok:

module.exports = {
    a:function(){
        //same logic you had in the function declaration
    }
}

Then, you can easily reflect on and enumerate module.exports and get all the function names.

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cli: http://nodejs.org/docs/v0.3.7/api/debugger.html

gui: https://github.com/dannycoates/node-inspector

There's also https://github.com/c4milo/node-webkit-agent in the works which will be a more powerful version of node-inspector.

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If you want to do some AOP, the route is AST.

You could build your own AOP framework with something like: http://esprima.org.

Or you could try node-burrito, excellent for not so complex aspects:

var burrito = require('burrito');

var src = burrito('someCall()', function (node) {
    if (node.name === 'call') node.wrap('qqq(%s)');
});

will generate

qqq(somecall())
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