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I am copying an example from python docs.

def powerset(iterable):
    "powerset([1,2,3]) --> () (1,) (2,) (3,) (1,2) (1,3) (2,3) (1,2,3)"
    s = list(iterable)
    return chain.from_iterable(combinations(s, r) for r in range(len(s)+1))

How could we randomize the order of the values that we get while the result of powerset remains lazily evaluated?

EDIT: The reason I want it is that I would like to compute the sum of the derived sets and stop as soon as I find two sets that have the same sum. If I am not mistaken, the problem is NP-complete.

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how random do you need? Calling set would make the order arbitrary, but not random. –  Skylar Saveland May 5 '12 at 20:09
1  
@skyl: What's worse, it wouldn't be lazy. If this were allowed, we could just call use list() and random.shuffle(). –  Niklas B. May 5 '12 at 20:09
2  
I don't think it is possible. Random implies that the last item generated might be first, which violates being lazy. You could get random-ish but you'll have to define what you need better. –  Nick Craig-Wood May 5 '12 at 20:11
1  
@Nick: It's well possible, but the generator would have to take some kind of argument to determine the order of generation. itertools doesn't have something like this built-in, so we're out of luck. –  Niklas B. May 5 '12 at 20:13
1  
Why will it being in a random order help you solve your problem? –  Lattyware May 5 '12 at 20:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

itertools.combinations() gives us results in a set order from the input. Given this, we can shuffle our input list to produce a random order of elements (obviously, there will be a lot less possible orders for the outcome).

def random_powerset(iterable):
     s = list(iterable)
     lengths = list(range(len(s)+1))
     shuffle(lengths)
     return chain.from_iterable(combinations(s, r) for r in lengths if not shuffle(s))

(This is a bit of an ugly hack - we know shuffle(s) will always return False, so we can add it as a condition to ensure it's run for each call of combinations().)

We pre-generate the list of lengths, so that we can shuffle that too.

It's not perfectly random (there will still be an order - all elements of length n will be clustered together, for example, and those elements will be in an order depending on the random order of the input), but there will be a fair amount of randomness, if that is enough for you.

Example output:

>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(), (2,), (0,), (1,), (2, 1), (2, 0), (1, 0), (1, 2, 0)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2), (0, 1, 2), (2,), (0,), (1,)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(0, 1, 2), (2,), (1,), (0,), (0, 2), (0, 1), (2, 1), ()]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(1, 2, 0), (0,), (2,), (1,), (), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(), (2, 1), (2, 0), (1, 0), (0,), (2,), (1,), (2, 1, 0)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(1, 0), (1, 2), (0, 2), (0, 2, 1), (), (1,), (0,), (2,)]

I think that's the best you can do without making it non-lazy.

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It's possible to improve on Lattyware's solution somewhat if you go beyond itertools.chain:

def chain_random(iterables):
    iterables = list(iterables)
    icount = len(iterables)
    if icount == 0: return 
    while icount > 1:
        shuffle(iterables)
        try:
            yield iterables[-1].next()
        except StopIteration:
            iterables.pop()
            icount -= 1
    for element in iterables[0]:
        yield element

def random_powerset(iterable):
    s = list(iterable)
    lengths = list(range(len(s)+1))
    shuffle(lengths)
    return chain_random(combinations(s, r) for r in lengths if not shuffle(s))

Example output:

>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(), (2, 1, 0), (1, 0), (1, 2), (2,), (0, 2), (1,), (0,)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(1, 0), (1, 2), (0, 2, 1), (2,), (), (0, 2), (0,), (1,)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(0, 1), (), (0, 2), (0,), (1, 2), (2, 0, 1), (1,), (2,)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(), (1, 2), (2,), (1, 0), (0,), (2, 0), (1,), (1, 0, 2)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(0, 1), (), (2,), (0, 2), (1, 2), (1,), (1, 2, 0), (0,)]
>>> list(random_powerset(range(3)))
[(0, 2, 1), (0,), (), (2, 0), (1,), (2, 1), (2,), (0, 1)]

itertools is written in C, so chain_random will be slower than itertools.chain. But you get more randomization this way.

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Here is another idea: Store the combinations generators and yield randomly until you consume all. This randomizes the order of set sizes also.

Edit: I assume you don't care about the order of elements in a single set, since you will be summing them. If you do, you can put a random.shuffle(next_value) before yield.

import itertools
import random

def random_powerset(l):
    combs = [itertools.combinations(l,i) for i in range(len(l)+1)]
    while combs:
        comb_index = random.choice(range(len(combs)))
        try:
            next_value = next(combs[comb_index])
            yield next_value
        except StopIteration:
            combs.pop(comb_index)

Output:

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(0, 1), (0, 2), (0, 1, 2), (1, 2), (), (0,), (1,), (2,)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(0, 1, 2), (0,), (), (0, 1), (1,), (0, 2), (1, 2), (2,)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(0, 1), (0, 1, 2), (0, 2), (), (0,), (1,), (1, 2), (2,)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(), (0,), (0, 1), (0, 1, 2), (1,), (0, 2), (2,), (1, 2)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(), (0, 1), (0,), (0, 1, 2), (1,), (0, 2), (2,), (1, 2)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(0, 1), (0,), (0, 2), (1, 2), (), (1,), (2,), (0, 1, 2)]

In : list(random_powerset(range(3)))
Out: [(), (0, 1, 2), (0,), (1,), (2,), (0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 2)]
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Are you sure this is lazily evaluated? What I see is that you produce all the values ahead of time and then return one by one. –  Dimitris Leventeas May 6 '12 at 12:05
    
@DimitrisLeventeas: It doesn't store the values. It stores the generators created by itertools.combinations. So combs will have n+1 generators, not 2**n values. –  Avaris May 6 '12 at 16:58

This is a lazy, and random solution:

import random

def powerset(seq):
    n = 2**len(seq)
    used = set([])
    while len(used) < n:
        choice = random.randint(0, n - 1)
        if not (choice in used):
            used.add(choice)
            binary = bin(choice)[2:].zfill(len(seq))
            yield [i[1] for i in zip(binary, seq) if i[0] == '1']
            #or following line if > python 2.7:
            #yield itertools.compress(seq, binary)

print list(powerset([1,2,3]))
print list(powerset([1,2,3]))
#output:
[[3], [1], [2, 3], [], [1, 2], [2], [1, 3], [1, 2, 3]]
[[2, 3], [1, 3], [1], [1, 2, 3], [1, 2], [2], [3], []]

If you consider the combinations of [1, 2, 3] in binary:

n  123 

0  000
1  001
2  010
3  011
4  100
5  101
6  110
7  111

Each combination can be labelled with a unique binary identifier. And there are always 2**len(seq) combinations.... So:

  1. Randomly select an integer between, 0, and 2**len(seq) - 1.
  2. check we haven't used it before (if we have, draw again).
  3. convert it to binary.
  4. zip it with seq.
  5. if the zipped binary digits are '0' we exclude it from the output.

This is lazy, and will work for large seq.

Small caveat:

There can be a problem, but it probably does not matter to you. Towards the end of a sequence you could run into trouble with repeated redraws (which could consume some time). As the probability of drawing an already drawn number is number of successful draws / 2**len(seq), so on a given draw, g, the expected number of draws to find a unused new number is:

n / (n - g)
#where n = 2**len(seq)

Which is fine, provided: n is small, or for large n: g << n (either or both of these situations are very likely, so neither should be much of an issue). In fact, with large n you can dispense with used and the checking for repeats altogether, as the expected number of iterations until the first repetition approximates to n**0.5.

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