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This is code I've written for an array that has 14 slots, each should have 4 in it except for the 6th and 13th slot, which are reverted back to 0. However, it doesn't compile. Does anyone know what I did wrong here?

using namespace std;
#include <iostream>

const int MAX = 14;

int main ()
{
    void printArray ();

    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}

void startArray (int beadArray[MAX])
{
    for(int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
    {
        beadArray[i]=4;
    }
    beadArray[6]=0;
    beadArray[13]=0;
}

//**********************************************//

void printArray ()
{
    startArray (int beadArray[MAX]);
    for(int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
    {
        cout<<i;
    }
}
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closed as too broad by BЈовић, Joce, Blue Magister, giammin, Jay Riggs Apr 30 '14 at 17:08

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
It's horrible. :) A lot of problems with this code. –  xebo May 5 '12 at 20:42
1  
The awesome thing about when something doesn't compile is that the compiler will say why. And you don't even have to run the [not-built] target. Not only is this information useful for you, it is the absolute minimum required information to make an acceptable question. –  user166390 May 5 '12 at 21:05
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about reviewing code and is better suited for [Code Review](codereview.stackexchange.com). –  Blue Magister Apr 30 '14 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some corrected mistakes :

  • declare your array outside startArray() function call if you want to use it outsite.
  • pass the array as reference if you want to modify it
  • cout << beadArray[i] instead of cout << i

.

using namespace std;    
#include <iostream>

const int MAX = 14;

int main ()    
{
    void printArray ();
    system ("pause");
    return 0;
}

void startArray (int &beadArray[MAX])
{
    for(int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
        beadArray[i]=4;
    beadArray[6]=0;
    beadArray[13]=0;
}

//**********************************************//

void printArray ()
{
    int beadArray[MAX];
    startArray (beadArray);

    for(int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
        cout<<beadArray[i];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help! I made the corrections according to the input from all of the above, but now it doesn't output anything. My code looks like the code above, from gabitzish. –  chrisvx930 May 5 '12 at 20:53
    
By the way, int &beadArray[MAX] is an array of references. You meant int (&beadArray)[MAX]. –  chris May 5 '12 at 21:07
startArray (int beadArray[MAX]);

You're trying to declare beadArray and use it in one step. You should declare it before using it:

int beadArray[MAX];
startArray (beadArray);

You also have a multitude of other problems:

  • using namespace std; has no effect because <iostream> hasn't been #included yet. You shouldn't use a global using namespace std; as well.

  • system ("PAUSE"); should be replaced. I personally use:

    cin.sync(); cin.get();

  • the compiler doesn't know about the functions when in main(). Before main(), you should put prototypes:

    void printArray(); void startArray (int []);

  • in main() you say void printArray();. When calling a function, just use the function name and arguments:

    printArray();

  • in printArray(), you're outputting i instead of beadArray [i]. There's also no spacing.

  • global constants are a bad thing to use.

The fixed code I had looks like this:

#include <iostream>

const int MAX = 14;

void startArray (int (&beadArray)[MAX]);
void printArray();

int main ()
{
    printArray ();

    std::cout << "\n\nPress enter to continue...";
    std::cin.sync();
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}


void startArray (int (&beadArray)[MAX])
{
    for(int i=0; i<MAX; ++i)
        beadArray[i]=4;

    beadArray[6]=0;
    beadArray[13]=0;
}

void printArray ()
{
    int beadArray[MAX];
    startArray (beadArray);

    for(int i=0; i<MAX; i++)
        std::cout << beadArray[i] << ' ';
}

I did leave the constant in, but there's lots you can do to replace it.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't void startArray (int beadArray[MAX]) going to copy the array and not modify the passed in array? Don't you need to take a reference or pointer? –  EdChum May 5 '12 at 20:57
    
@EdChum, it worked fine for me. I must admit I've never actually used a reference to an array. I've barely passed around arrays at all (minus in my class where not a mention was made about passing them by reference, or pointer) in favour of vectors or pointers. –  chris May 5 '12 at 20:58
    
Thanks for your help again! –  chrisvx930 May 5 '12 at 20:59
    
@EdChum, I changed the final code to use a reference instead. –  chris May 5 '12 at 21:01
    
@chris I am surprised this worked, your function signature is taking a copy of an array and you pass this in, if it was a pointer to int and you passed the address of the int array then I would expect that to work, or you changed the function signature to take a reference to an array. –  EdChum May 5 '12 at 21:01

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