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I'm consistently getting this result back from BigQuery:

{
 "error": {
  "errors": [
   {
    "domain": "global",
    "reason": "internalError",
    "message": "Unexpected. Please try again."
   }
  ],
  "code": 503,
  "message": "Unexpected. Please try again."
 }
}

The query that causes it is of the form:

SELECT y.f1, y.f2, y.f3, y.f4, y.f5, y.f6, y.f7,  
       t.f1, t.f2, t.f3, t.f4, t.f5, t.f6, t.f7
FROM
  (
    SELECT 
      f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7 
    FROM
      ds.data_20120503 
    WHERE 
      kind='A'
  )
  AS y
  JOIN 
  (
    SELECT 
      f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7 
    FROM
      ds.data_20120504 
    WHERE 
      kind='A'
  )
  AS t
  ON y.f7 = t.f7

If I run just the subselects, they work fine, so I guess it has something to to with the 'join'. Where should I go from here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks like you're hitting a bug in bigquery -- when both join keys are named the same and are both returned in the results, we get an invalid schema and fail the query. I've filed this as a bug internally, hopefully will have a fix soon.

As a workaround, if you either remove y.f7 or t.f7 from the selected results (since you're joining on their equality, including both as results is redundant). Alternately you can use an as clause in one of the selects to name it something else -- as in f7 as joinedF7 .

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"Looks like you're hitting a bug in bigquery": glad to help. :). "remove y.f7 or t.f7 from the selected results": will try that, thanks. –  laslowh May 7 '12 at 20:18
    
Yup, that works. –  laslowh May 8 '12 at 2:20

I suspect that what you're seeing is (1) too much data getting returned in such a way that (2) we're giving back a terrible error message. Do you know roughly how many rows are in each subselect for a fixed value of f7?

To check, you could try adding a LIMIT 10 to each of the subselects and run the query again. If that works, we need to figure out a way to write a query to find out what you want to know. If that still fails, send a job_id so we can investigate.

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I will check it when I get to work tomorrow, but it's probably about 17000 rows in each subselect. –  laslowh May 6 '12 at 21:24
    
Adding "LIMIT 10" to each of the subselects appears to make no difference (at least using the web client). An example of my query can be found in "job_f789c7dbedf645aeb4c98225bb1e345c" –  laslowh May 7 '12 at 14:01

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