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I m looking for algorithm scroll number For example;

i have array which has 1 ,2,3,4 numbers i want to make my new array 4,1,2,3

Does anyone knows how to do this?

But not just for D[4] it ca be 1,2,3,4,5,6,7

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2  
Does it need to use arrays? Because it would be more efficient to do this with a linked list. A circular linked list would be even better. –  Justin May 5 '12 at 21:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The in place version:

#include <stdio.h>

void swap(int* a, int* b){
int temp = *a;
*a = *b;
*b = temp;
}

int main(){
int i;
int size = 4;
int arr[4] = {1,2,3,4};
for(i = 0; i < size; i++){
  printf("%d, ", arr[i]);
}
printf("\n");
for( i = size-1; i > 0; i-- ){
  swap(&arr[i],&arr[i-1]);
}
for(i = 0; i < size; i++){
  printf("%d, ", arr[i]);
}
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Using modular arithmetics is probably the most elegant way to do it. For example, you can do it like this:

int a[size];
int b[size];

for (int n=0; n<size; n++) 
  b[(n+1)%size] = a[n];

If you need to shift the elements for more than one position, you can change the b[(n+1)%size] to b[(n+2)%size] and so on.

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Random fact of the day: shifting by more than one place is called a Barrel Shifter - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barrel_shifter –  Corey Ogburn May 19 '12 at 18:37
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

/* Assumed slide is >= 0 and < arr_len. */
void slide_arr(int * arr, int arr_len, int slide)
{
  int i;
  /* If you are using C99, variable length array would be useful. */
  int * tmp_arr = malloc(arr_len * sizeof(int));
  memcpy(tmp_arr, arr, arr_len * sizeof(int));

  for(i = 0; i < arr_len; i++) {
    arr[i] = tmp_arr[(slide + i) % arr_len];
  }

  free(tmp_arr);
}

int main(void)
{
  int i;
  int arr[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
  slide_arr(arr, _countof(arr), 2);

  for(i = 0; i < _countof(arr); i++) {
    printf("%d, ", arr[i]);
  }

  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Given the array {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, slide_arr() with slide as 1 will give:

{5, 1, 2, 3, 4}

For slide as 2, it will give:

{4, 5, 1, 2, 3}

I wrote this in VC++. If you are compiling with GCC, use ARRAY_SIZE instead of _countof.

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For small enough lists, you could double the list in one large array and have a pointer traverse the large array. I don't know exactly how to do this in C, but hopefully a C++ example will get the point across.

int x[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3 };

You could then have a second pointer move up the array like so:

int* noshift = x;
int* oneshift = x + 1;
int* twoshift = x + 2;
int* threeshift = x + 3;

The fourth shift is the same as not shifting in this example. This will take up slightly more memory. For an array of n elements, this will take up 2*n-1 elements in the array, but time vs. memory and all that jazz.

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#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
 int i;
 int len = 5;
 int arr = {1,2,3,4,5};

 int last = arr[len-1]; // Last element of the array example(5)

 for(i = len - 1; i > 0 ; i--)
   arr[i] = arr[i-1];

 arr[0] = last;

 retrurn 0;
}
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1  
Thanks for posting an answer! While a code snippet could answer the question it's still great to add some addition information around, like explain, etc .. –  j0k Oct 4 '12 at 6:52

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