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In test.txt, I have 2 lines of sentences.

The heart was made to be broken.
There is no surprise more magical than the surprise of being loved.

In the codes:

import re
file = open('test.txt','r')#specify file to open
data = file.readlines()
file.close()

print "---------------------------------------------------"
count = 0
for line in data:
    line_split = re.findall(r'[^ \t\n\r, ]+',line)
    count = count + 1
    def chunks(line_split, n):
        for i in xrange(0, len(line_split), n):
            yield line_split[i:i+n]

    separate_word = list(chunks(line_split, 8))

    for i, word in enumerate(separate_word, 1):
        print count, ' '.join(word)
    print "---------------------------------------------------"

Results from the codes:

---------------------------------------------------
1 The heart was made to be broken.
---------------------------------------------------
2 There is no surprise more magical than the
2 surprise of being loved.
---------------------------------------------------

Is there any possible way for displaying the number of sentence in the first line only?

Expect results:

---------------------------------------------------
1 The heart was made to be broken.
---------------------------------------------------
2 There is no surprise more magical than the
  surprise of being loved.
---------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question
1  
Don't add the language name to the title - that's what tags are for. – Latty May 5 '12 at 22:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simply check if it's the first line:

for i, word in enumerate(separate_word):
    if i == 0:
        print count, ' '.join(word)
    else:
        print " ", ' '.join(word)

I strongly suggest you use the with statement to open the file. This is more readable and handles closing the file for you, even on exceptions.

Another good idea is to loop directly over the file - this is a better idea as it doesn't load the entire file into memory at once, which is not needed and could cause problems with big files.

You should also use enumerate() as you have done here for the loop over data, as that way you will not to manually deal with count.

You are also defining chunks() repeatedly, which is a little pointless, better to define it once at the beginning. Where calling it, there is also no need to make a list - we can iterate directly over the generator.

If we correct all of this, we get the cleaner:

import re

def chunks(line_split, n):
    for i in xrange(0, len(line_split), n):
        yield line_split[i:i+n]

print "---------------------------------------------------"

with open("test.txt", "r") as file:
    for count, line in enumerate(file, 1):
        line_split = re.findall(r'[^ \t\n\r, ]+',line)
        separate_word = chunks(line_split, 8)
        for i, word in enumerate(separate_word):
            if i == 0:
                print count, ' '.join(word)
            else:
                print " ", ' '.join(word)

        print "---------------------------------------------------"

It's also worth noting the variable names are a little misleading word, for example, is not a word.

share|improve this answer
    
i == 0 display nothing. It is correct if i == 1 – ThanaDaray May 5 '12 at 22:15
    
@ThanaDaray Note my change from enumerate(separate_word, 1) to enumerate(separate_word). – Latty May 5 '12 at 22:16
    
@sarnold Whoops, fixed. – Latty May 5 '12 at 22:16
    
Thank you again. – ThanaDaray May 5 '12 at 22:20
    
@ThanaDaray No problem. Feel free to accept the answer if it solves your problem. – Latty May 5 '12 at 22:20

Python comes with text wrapping built in. I admit that the formatting below isn't perfect, but you'll get the idea :-)

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
import textwrap

with open('test.txt') as fd:
    T = [line.strip() for line in fd]

for n, s in enumerate(T):
    print '-'*42
    sys.stdout.write("%d " % n)
    for i in textwrap.wrap(s, 45):
        sys.stdout.write("%s\n" % i)
print '-'*42

Outputs:

------------------------------------------
0 The heart was made to be broken.
------------------------------------------
1 There is no surprise more magical than the
surprise of being loved.
------------------------------------------
share|improve this answer

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