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Question was solved :)

I was hoping you could help explain what I am doing wrong.

Thanks in advance!

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct node {
    char *data;
    struct node * previous;
    struct node * next;
} node, *nodePTR;

/* Insert into list */
void insert(char * buf, nodePTR tail) {
    nodePTR myNode;
    myNode = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

    myNode->data = malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
    strcpy(myNode->data,buf);
    myNode->next = NULL;
    myNode->previous = tail;
    tail->next = myNode;
    //tail = tail->next;
}

void printlist(nodePTR head, int numElements) {
    nodePTR tmpNode;
    tmpNode = head;

    printf("\n\n");

    while(tmpNode!=NULL) {
        printf("Node data: %s\n", tmpNode->data);
        tmpNode = tmpNode->next;
    }
}

int main(void) {
    /* Variables */
    int numElements;
    int i;
    char buf[10];

    nodePTR head, tail;

    tail = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    head = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

    tail->data = "EMPTY\0";
    tail->next = NULL;
    tail->previous = NULL;

    head = tail;

    printf("Please enter the number of elements:\n");
    scanf("%d", &numElements);

    /* Build the list */
    for(i = 0; i < numElements; i++) {
        printf("Please enter the data:");
        scanf("%s", buf);
        insert(buf, tail);
        tail = tail->next;
    }

    printlist(head, numElements);

    return 0;
}

Here is my output:
Please enter the number of elements:
3
Please enter the data:n1
Please enter the data:n2
Please enter the data:n3

Node data: EMPTY
Node data: n3

share|improve this question
    
Post the relevant code here (not behind a link), and describe what debugging steps you've taken, and where you're stuck. –  Michael Petrotta May 5 '12 at 22:48
1  
Better to post the code here directly. And might I suggest that you try running your program through a debugger? If you're on a Linux system I'd recommend getting acquainted with GDB –  Fredrik Pihl May 5 '12 at 22:48

2 Answers 2

I usually try to leave the head and tail NULL until an element is inserted, rather than try to detect an empty node all over the place. Included is an example of a very simple linked list I use. Note that this version is for microcontrollers so I malloc/free the memory outside the list functions (sometimes from a preallocated node pool):

struct ListNodeStruct
{
  struct ListNodeStruct* Next;
  int Value;
};
typedef struct ListNodeStruct ListNode;

struct ListStruct
{
  ListNode* Head;
  ListNode* Tail;
  int Count;
};
typedef struct ListStruct List;

List CreateList()
//creates a new List
{
  List R;
  R.Head = NULL;
  R.Tail = NULL;
  R.Count = 0;
  return(R);
}

void ListInsertFirst(List* L, ListNode* V)
//insert the object at the start of the list
{
  V->Next = L->Head;
  L->Head = V;
  if (L->Count == 0)
    L->Tail = V;
  L->Count ++;
}

void ListInsertLast(List* L, ListNode* V)
//insert the object at the end of the list
{
  V->Next = NULL;
  if (L->Tail)
    L->Tail->Next = V;
  else
    L->Head = V;
  L->Tail = V;
  L->Count++;
}

ListNode* ListRemoveFirst(List* L)
//remove the first object in the list (no memory is freed)
{
  ListNode* R = L->Head;

  if (L->Head == NULL)
    return(R);

  L->Head = L->Head->Next;
  L->Count--;
  if (L->Count == 0)
    L->Tail = L->Head;
  return(R);  
}

Specific to your code, some problems can be avoided when you treat the object as a black box except for the functions that are allowed to see inside. Specifically, the beginning of your main function as well as line 69 directly manipulates the list members. I usually try to have a function dedicated to initializing the object, because you will have to do this again in many places as you use lists.

On line 54, you push a pointer to a string literal into your structure. This pointer is only valid on the current stack frame, meaning when the function exits this pointer no longer will contain "EMPTY\0". You should call a malloc and store it there, and don't forget to free. Also note that C automatically null-terminates string literals so you don't need the \0 at the end.

Finally, the reason it might not be iterating properly in the print function is because you are starting your print iterator at the tail and not the head.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited my post to include a little more notes regarding your version. –  Nathan Wiebe May 5 '12 at 23:26
    
I was meaning something like: char[] EmptyStr = "EMPTY"; tail->data = (char*)malloc(strlen(EmptyStr) + 1); strcpy(tail->data, EmptyStr); –  Nathan Wiebe May 6 '12 at 0:10

Well, I think your problem is you point all your nodes to the same buffer. You need to copy that buffer every time.

myNode->data = buf;

Just points data to the address of the buffer. Then later, when you go update that buffer, the address stays the same but the contents change. So everything is essentially pointing to the same string. You need to copy the contents of the buffer into a new array and point data at that.

Also this line seems questionable when you are looping adding nodes:

head = head->next;

Insert should be taking care of that.

Here is your code rejiggered to work:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct node {
    char *data;
    struct node * previous;
    struct node * next;
} node, *nodePTR;

/* Insert into list */
void insert(char * buf, nodePTR head) {
    nodePTR myNode;
    myNode = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

    myNode->data = malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
    strcpy(myNode->data,buf);
    myNode->next = head->next;
    myNode->previous = head;
    head->next = myNode;
}

void printlist(nodePTR head, int numElements) {
    nodePTR tmpNode;
    tmpNode = head;

    printf("\n\n");

    while(tmpNode!=NULL) {
        printf("Node data: %s\n", tmpNode->data);
        tmpNode = tmpNode->next;
    }
}

int main(void) {
    /* Variables */
    int numElements;
    int i;
    char buf[10];

    nodePTR head, tail;

    tail = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    head = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

    tail->data = "EMPTY\0";
    tail->next = NULL;
    tail->previous = NULL;

    head = tail;

    printf("Please enter the number of elements:\n");
    //scanf("%d", &numElements);
    numElements=3;

    /* Build the list */
    for(i = 0; i < numElements; i++) {
        printf("Please enter the data:");
        buf[0] = 60 + i;
        buf[1] = 0;
        insert(buf, head);
    }

    printlist(head, numElements);

    return 0;
}

I got rid of the input prompts so I could make it work on codepad, but the idea is the same. Also I think I accidentally got rid of keeping track of the tail. This will insert stuff right after the head So it will go start:

HEAD - TAIL

HEAD - 1st - TAIL

HEAD - 2nd - 1st - TAIL

...

where 2nd is the 2nd element you inserted.

As for your

char * tmpBuf = buf;

The problem is that tmpBuf is on the stack and it still points to the same address as buf. You needed to allocate a new buffer with malloc (or build a new house per my metaphor in the comments).

This line

myNode = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

Creates enough room for the things you defined in your node struct. Which in your case are pointers to an array of characters, a next node and a previous node. So all you have room for is the address of an array of chars. You don't actually have room for an array of chars in your node.

myNode->data = malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);

This malloc actually makes room for an array of 10 chars and saves the address of the array in your nodes data field. Without this 2nd malloc you never make room for actual arrays. When you are first learning data structures, I might suggest using ints as your data type. There are less pitfalls to distract you from the workings of the actual data strucure you are learning about.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you see what I am saying about the buffer though? buf is like the address of a house that 10 letters can live in. So myNode->data = buf; stores the address of the house in data. Then when you call scanf("%s", buf); you are changing who lives in the house. So all those nodes still have the address of the SAME house. When you go visit the house in printlist to see who is living there, you will only find the most recent residents. Instead you need to make a new house every time you call insert and point data at that new house. –  Justin May 6 '12 at 0:00
    
Well, you have wierd things going on with head and tail. You malloc memory for both and then assign them to be equal. I might work on it a bit more yourself and ask a new question if you are still having issues. A few other things, you may want to delete some of these comments. The discussion got a little out of hand. And in the future, try to avoid modifying your code too much. Now the question that I answered is not really the question as it currently stands. Just some tips to help you be more successful around here :). I tried to answer you malloc question in my offical answer. –  Justin May 6 '12 at 1:02

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