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Exception in thread "Thread-8" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at sun.misc.Unsafe.compareAndSwapLong(Native Method)
    at java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong.compareAndSet(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.Random.next(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.Random.nextInt(Unknown Source)
        at sim.ant.colony.ants.Forager.moveTo(Forager.java:108)

I'm working with a multi threaded application(Ant Simulation Colony) where I created every ant as a thread and when tens of threads (ants) are running, above exception occurs after every few turns and thread is killed. code where I'm using Random() is;

Random rand = new Random();
return adjacents.elementAt(rand.nextInt(8));

this code is written in a thread's local member function. So assuming every thread creates random numbers hundred of times and there are more than ten threads are working.

Can somebody help me with this exception?

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7  
You should consider posting some more code and some more of the stacktrace because a stacoverflow is a recursion that just goes too deep and the stack gets filled. Therefore, the beginning of the stacktrace is hardly an indication of the problem. –  Guillaume Polet May 5 '12 at 23:07
    
Is the object 'rand' shared amongst the threads? –  Everyone May 5 '12 at 23:21
    
"rand" is not shared. Every thread creates it for using. I think that there is something wrong with the index bounds of arrays i'm using because i couldn't generate the above scenario again but encountered with some new. stacktraces is a good option, I'm doing this now... –  nommyravian May 5 '12 at 23:25
    
This appears to happen within the Random ... can you use Math.random in lieu of java.util.Random (which I assume you use at present) and check whether the error you encountered recurs? –  Everyone May 5 '12 at 23:33
1  
@Everyone Math.random() uses also java.util.Random behind the scenes. For the problem he has, read my answer below, it may help you understand what is going on and why you should not waste time investigating java.util.Random –  Guillaume Polet May 5 '12 at 23:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Not really an answer to your problem but more an example of the problem you have, how you can track it and how you can fix it.

Take the code below:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class StackOverflowExample {

    public static void a() {
        Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
        map.putAll(b());

    }

    private static Map<String, String> b() {
        Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
        map.put("a", "a");
        a();
        return map;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        a();
    }
}

It will produce a StackOverFlowError instantly:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at java.util.HashMap$Entry.<init>(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.addEntry(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.put(Unknown Source)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:14)

The problem is not in HashMap, nor HashMap$Entry. The problem is that a() and b() call each other recursively without a proper stop-condition, meaning infinitely. If you actually look below in the stack, you immediately discover that pattern:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.StackOverflowError
    at java.util.HashMap$Entry.<init>(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.addEntry(Unknown Source)
    at java.util.HashMap.put(Unknown Source)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:14)
    at StackOverflowExample.a(StackOverflowExample.java:8)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:15)
    at StackOverflowExample.a(StackOverflowExample.java:8)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:15)
    at StackOverflowExample.a(StackOverflowExample.java:8)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:15)
    at StackOverflowExample.a(StackOverflowExample.java:8)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:15)
    at StackOverflowExample.a(StackOverflowExample.java:8)
    at StackOverflowExample.b(StackOverflowExample.java:15)
        ...

You need to find the recursion that goes too deep in your code. Either fix it or change it to a non-recursive method.

Using a debugger can be of great help for that as you can step into each method call and put breakpoints (amongst plenty of other good stuffs).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Polet for your help but actually for my case, there are lot of threads so debugging a multi threaded application using debugger is not an easy task (remember that I can't produce the exception scenario with less threads). Number two is that I'm calling a member function of my Runnable from another member function of the same class and it was happening in a loop running for a stopping condition so limiting the scenario gives me only the call from previous function and then the exception at the above mentioned code (rand.nextInt(8)) so it didn't help as well. –  nommyravian May 6 '12 at 1:10
    
I changed the previously added logic and it helped me to overcome this exception. I guess that it was some where in my used data structures out of bound indexes. Thanks a lot for your help and concern by the way :) –  nommyravian May 6 '12 at 1:16

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