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The following program displays a counter that shows the load on the garbage collection.

I'd like to be able to see load, for example in MB, over a period of time, for example per 1/60th of a second frame.

using System;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework;
using Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Graphics;

namespace proj
{
    public class game : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Game
    {
        private GraphicsDeviceManager graphics;
        private SpriteBatch sprite_batch;
        private SpriteFont font;

        public game()
        {
            graphics = new GraphicsDeviceManager(this);
        }

        protected override void Initialize()
        {
            Content.RootDirectory = "Content";
            sprite_batch = new SpriteBatch(GraphicsDevice);
            font = Content.Load<SpriteFont>("font");
            base.Initialize();
        }

        protected override void Update(
            GameTime game_time)
        {
            //base.Update(game_time);
        }

        protected override void Draw(
            GameTime gameTime)
        {
            GraphicsDevice.Clear(
                Color.DarkBlue);
            sprite_batch.Begin();
            sprite_batch.DrawString(
                font,
                ((float)GC.GetTotalMemory(true) / (1024 * 1024)).ToString(),
                //GC.GetTotalMemory(true).ToString(),
                new Vector2(20, 20),
                Color.White);
            sprite_batch.End();
            //base.Draw(gameTime);
        }
    }
}

I'm seeing however just over 0.4MB which seems high for this program where I expect that some new objects are created behind the scenes each frame, but beyond that I can only see a Vector2 and a few numerical and string values during ((float)GC.GetTotalMemory(true) / (1024 * 1024)).ToString() being created.

In a larger program where similarly little occurs during draw and update because I've wrapped what would be occurring in comments, but a lot of code exists, some of which is run once at the start of the program, the program shows a constant load 90MB per frame.

What's more, I've tried adding:

pos n2;
for (UInt32 n = 0; n < 100000; n++)
{
    n2 = new pos(n, 0);
    func(n2);
}

Where

public class pos
{
    public pos(
        float x,
        float y)
    {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public float
        x, y;
}

private void func(
    pos p)
{
}

To draw, and the GC value changes very little.

Am I interpreting this wrongly? If so then how do I display what I require?

It seems as if GC is causing performance issues for me, in the form of pauses in execution about once a second. They are barely noticeable on PC but very obvious on the XBOX. I am doing this to analyse if this is the case.

I could for example optimise (from the point of view of the performance of the code when running) code like:

loop()
{
    func(new pos(..., ...));
}

Into code like:

pos p = new pos(0, 0);
loop()
{
    p.x = ...;
    p.y = ...;
    func(p);
}

While it's questionably relevant, it may asked. My stance on GC is that I wouldn't by choice use an OO programing language without it. I think it's essential to creating good code.


To clarify. I'm looking for the load on the garbage collector over time. The GC seems to return this information in the form of bytes however the value returned seems more consistent with the total memory usage for the whole program.


I see nobody has realy answered the question, there is one close request, the question has ended up being huge where I keep having to update it with obvious details. It seems it's easy here for people to completely miss the point. I don't see why I can't have an in app GC load counter for the app thats not showing a clearly incorrect result, like 90MB when nothings happening each frame.

It's gone beyond being practically useful for me now because it's been such a long time.

share|improve this question
    
the second snippet with loop() won't cause any garbage, but mind that you have public mutable fields. –  lukas May 6 '12 at 1:18
    
Why make pos a class and why not just use Vector2 instead? Vector2 is a struct, so on their own it will not trigger heap allocations. –  Brian Rasmussen May 6 '12 at 2:30
    
Because pos is used in the above question to create garbage to demonstrate how the GC value isn't showing the value I'm looking for and then purly as a placeholder to show how other code could be optimised. –  alan2here May 13 '12 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

I just joined so I can't comment but it seems what you want:

"I'm looking for the load on the garbage collector over time. Not the memory useage of the whole program. The GC seems to return this information in the form of bytes" 

already exists. Just use the standard .net performance counters that are already installed on your system. Start->Control Panel->Administrative Tools->Performance Monitor fire up your app open the perf monitor then select your app and under the .NET CLR Memory counters add what you need. There are great counters to help you see if you really have a GC problem, the give memory stats and more importantly can tell you how much memory is in each generation, how often they are being collection allocations/second etc.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Unfortunately the performance monitor doesn't update often enough and is a separate program. I've also got a profiler, thats also a separate program and in the other direction for functionality, I can't understand many of the profilers complicated graphs. –  alan2here May 13 '12 at 15:39

Firstly, If you want to optimize the memory you should use memory profiler. It will show you all the detail you need (where is the bottleneck? Does my code cause it or library?). Building helper like this is tedious and error prone. Also, in current state won't tell you much, will it?

Secondly, Vector2 is a value type so new Vector2(20, 20) shouldn't cause any garbage (variable is not closed over, no boxing, no iterator blocks etc.). If you draw multiple strings, use DrawString that takes StringBuilder.

private StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder();

    protected override void Update(GameTime game_time)
    {
        text.Remove(0, text.Length);
        text.Append((float)GC.GetTotalMemory(true) / (1024 * 1024)));
        //base.Update(game_time);
    }

If so then how do I display what I require?

Not sure If I get your question right, but to show memory usage over a time with details you have use a bespoke tool. Get a profiler.

EDIT:

What's more, I've tried adding:

pos n2;
for (UInt32 n = 0; n < 100000; n++)
{
    n2 = new pos(n, 0);
    func(n2);
}

What is pos? Is it value type like Vector2? Vector2 should not cause garbage(usually).

It seems as if GC is causing performance issues for me, in the form of pauses in execution about once a second. They are barely noticeable on PC but very obvious on the XBOX. I am doing this to analyse if this is the case.

I know your pain. The obvious solution is to avoid allocation. If you cannot avoid it, you can build a simple caching mechanism (a HashSet/Dictionary of objects) and update the values accordingly. Load as much as possible before a user starts the game.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm looking for the load on the garbage collector over time. Not the memory useage of the whole program. The GC seems to return this information in the form of bytes. –  alan2here May 6 '12 at 0:42
    
Pos is similar to Vector2 but it's a class, mutable, passes by reference etc... –  alan2here May 6 '12 at 0:47
    
It's a good idea, I precompute a lot already on loading. –  alan2here May 6 '12 at 0:54
    
"I'm looking for the load on the garbage collector over time. Not the memory useage of the whole program" the profiler will tell you which code causes the most allocation. You should optimize it firstly. –  lukas May 6 '12 at 1:10

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