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The main problem is, that raising an event from one thread can invoke delegates which should only invoked in a certain thread context. After doing some research on this problem i thought, maybe its possible to pass some kind of synchronization context along with each subscription to an event:

SomeClass.SmartSyncEvent += (myDelegate, someReferenceToAThread);

and then raise the event and it somehow does:

foreach(subscriber)
{
    someReferenceToAThread.Invoke(myDelegate);
}

This is super pseudo code, but maybe someone has already done things like this, or knows of any .NET classes which can set up such a pattern. thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The best way to do this is pass SomeClass a synchronization context via ISynchronizeInvoke.

public class SomeClass
{
    public event EventHandler SmartSyncEvent;

    public ISynchronizeInvoke SynchronizingObject { get; set; }

    public void RaiseSmartSyncEvent()
    {
        if (SynchronizingObject != null)
        {
            SynchronizingObject.Invoke(
              (Action)(()=>
              {
                  SmartSyncEvent();
              }), null);
        }
        else
        {
            SmartSyncEvent();
        }
    }
}

This pattern is similar to the way System.Timers.Timer is implemented. The problem with it is that every subscriber will be marshaled onto the same synchronizing object. It does not appear that this is what you want though.

Fortunately delegates store the class instance upon which the method should be invoke via the Target property. We can exploit this by extracting it before we invoke the delegate and using it as the synchronizing object assuming of course that it is a ISynchronizeInvoke itself. We could actually enforce that by using custom add and remove event accessors.

public class SomeClass
{
    private EventHandler _SmartSyncEvent;

    public event EventHandler SmartSyncEvent
    {
        add
        {
            if (!(value.Target is ISynchronizeInvoke))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException();
            }
            _SmartSyncEvent = (EventHandler)Delegate.Combine(_SmartSyncEvent, value);
        }
        remove
        {
            _SmartSyncEvent = (EventHandler)Delegate.Remove(_SmartSyncEvent, value);
        }
    }

    public void RaiseMyEvent()
    {
        foreach (EventHandler handler in _SmartSyncEvent.GetInvocationList())
        {
            var capture = handler;
            var synchronizingObject = (ISynchronizeInvoke)handler.Target;
            synchronizingObject.Invoke(
                (Action)(() =>
                {
                    capture(this, new EventArgs());
                }), null);
        }
    }
}

This is a lot better in that each subscriber can be marshaled independently of the others. The problem with it is that the handlers must be instance methods that reside in an ISynchronizeInvoke class. Also, Delegate.Target is null for static methods. This is why I enforce that constraint with the custom add accessor.


You could make it execute the handlers synchronously if Delegate.Target were null or otherwise could not be casted into a useful synchronizing object. There are a lot of variations on this theme.

In WPF you could code for DispatcherObject instead of ISynchronizeInvoke.

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wow, excellent answer! it does not only show full understanding of the question, but also provides the best possible solution. big ups! –  thalm May 6 '12 at 2:12
    
on which cases will the Delegate have a Target which is a valid sync context? is it only UI classes, or any other class too, which was created from a valid sync context? –  thalm May 6 '12 at 2:27
    
Pretty much only the UI elements like Form and Control since they implement ISynchronizeInvoke directly. WPF uses DispatcherObject which you could code for as well. And of course nothing is stopping a developer from creating a custom ISynchronizeInvoke class that contains the event handler. It would be inconvenient for them, but then again pretty much any option would have some level of inconvenience associated with it. At least this way most of the common event handler containers are handled automagically. –  Brian Gideon May 6 '12 at 2:48

Please see my answer in this topic. I provide links to 3 blog posts and a YouTube instructional video that I have written, that all talk about synchronization with UI thread-safely. Each blog post covers a completely different method of doing just what you are asking, so its up to you which method you use. Some are easier than others, but are all generally intermediate.

Edit quoted from the linked question.

You actually have a lot of options.

(1) BackgroundWorker. If you truly want the easiest programming model for asynchronous work in WinForms, it would be this. It's generally used to do some asynchronous task and report progress though, but you don't have to report progress if you don't need to.

(2) Event Based Asynchronous Pattern. If you want to make a full blown component that does some asynchronous task, have full control of reporting progress and your own custom events, then this is one way to do it. This also helps you understand threading more than a BackgroundWorker. Because I am a visual person, I created a full video presentation on how to do just this with WinForms.

(3) Task Parallel Library. You can use the TPL with WinForms, and I wrote a very detailed blog post on how to do just that here.

(4) Async and Await. Please note that this requires .NET 4.5, C# 5.0 and the C# 5.0 compiler only included in Visual Studio 11, which is only in BETA right now. However, I also have a full blog post on how to do just this.

(5) ISynchronizedInvoke with Threads. This is another option, which I also have a full blog about.

It's really up to you which method you choose. My suggestion is take a brief look at each and pick on a method based on how advanced the subject feels to you, or which ever method might meet your requirement the best.

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While this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. –  Matt Ball May 6 '12 at 1:22
    
Then vote to close instead of answering? –  Matt Ball May 6 '12 at 1:27
    
good patterns, but not exactly fitting my problem, as they all assume that i have access to the subscriber code, which i don't have. so the magic must happen when subscribing and inside the event invocation method. –  thalm May 6 '12 at 2:18
    
The ISynchronizedInvoke blog post does exactly what you want. You simply just call SynchronizedInvoke.Invoke(myForm, () => control.Text = "") for example. –  David Anderson - DCOM May 6 '12 at 2:26
    
ok, thanks! i will have a closer look at it. –  thalm May 6 '12 at 2:28

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