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How can I validate a string using Regular Expressions to only allow alphanumeric characters in it?

(I don't want to allow for any spaces either).

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6 Answers 6

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Use the expression:

^[a-zA-Z0-9]*$

ie:

Regex r = new Regex("^[a-zA-Z0-9]*$");
if (r.IsMatch(SomeString)) {
  ...
}
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How about in javascript, same thing I guess? –  mrblah Jun 26 '09 at 0:25
7  
Let's hope that's only used in English-speaking countries... –  Anders Bornholm Feb 15 '13 at 8:17
    
If you sanitize database names or something internal like that you will not care if it does not run in English-speaking country. –  Ognyan Dimitrov Jul 3 at 8:04

In .NET 4.0 you can use LINQ:

if (yourText.All(char.IsLetterOrDigit))
{
    //just letters and digits.
}
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The most elegant and least error prone solution. –  Ognyan Dimitrov Jul 3 at 8:05

You could do it easily with an extension function rather than a regex ...

public static bool IsAlphaNum(this string str)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!(char.IsLetter(str[i])) && (!(char.IsNumber(str[i]))))
            return false;
    }

    return true;
}

Per comment :) ...

public static bool IsAlphaNum(this string str)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
        return false;

    return (str.ToCharArray().All(c => Char.IsLetter(c) || Char.IsNumber(c)));
}
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2  
It may be a matter of taste, but I would express the loop as "foreach (char c in str) {...}". Whether an empty string is to be considered as OK depends on the application, so I would take this out. I also wouldn't pad 6 empty lines into such a trivial routine, but I guess that's C#/Java/C++ style -- the coders seem to be paid by screen real estate. Anyway, this is the right direction, so +1. –  Svante Jun 26 '09 at 0:40
2  
I'd think we'd want to use IsDigit in this situation, rather than IsNumber -- IsNumber will return true for digits, or for things that look like numbers (fractions, Roman numerals, etc.; see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yk2b3t2y.aspx). Given that, and if one was feeling particularly evil, one could compress the contents of IsAlphaNum even further: return string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) ? false : str.ToCharArray().All(Char.IsLetterOrDigit); –  stack Feb 13 '10 at 0:07
2  
Note that Char.IsLetter will evaluate to true for "letters" other than a-zA-Z. For example, Japanese あ, Chinese 的, Korean 한 etc are considered to be Unicode "letters". If this is your intention, then fine, but judging from the various regex expressions in the other answers, this is likely not what most considered to be alpha[numeric]. –  Dono Feb 20 at 5:57

While I think the regex-based solution is probably the way I'd go, I'd be tempted to encapsulate this in a type.

public class AlphaNumericString
{
    public AlphaNumericString(string s)
    {
        Regex r = new Regex("^[a-zA-Z0-9]*$");
        if (r.IsMatch(s))
        {
            value = s;                
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Only alphanumeric characters may be used");
        }
    }

    private string value;
    static public implicit operator string(AlphaNumericString s)
    {
        return s.value;
    }
}

Now, when you need a validated string, you can have the method signature require an AlphaNumericString, and know that if you get one, it is valid (apart from nulls). If someone attempts to pass in a non-validated string, it will generate a compiler error.

You can get fancier and implement all of the equality operators, or an explicit cast to AlphaNumericString from plain ol' string, if you care.

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I've never seen this approach, but I like the clarity of intent and your justification. +1. –  Cory House Sep 30 '11 at 1:28
    
This is new to me. I'm trying to understand the static public implicit operator string part –  Hassan Gulzar Jun 24 at 12:39

^\w+$ will allow a-zA-Z0-9_

Use ^[a-zA-Z0-9]+$ to disallow underscore.

Note that both of these require the string not to be empty. Using * instead of + allows empty strings.

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I needed to check for A-Z, a-z, 0-9; without a regex (even though the OP asks for regex).

Blending various answers and comments here, and discussion from http://stackoverflow.com/a/9975693/292060, this tests for letter or digit, avoiding other language letters, and avoiding other numbers such as fraction characters.

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(testString)
    && testString.All(c => Char.IsLetterOrDigit(c) && (c < 128)))
{
    // Alphanumeric.
}
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