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I'm trying to write a container that takes both int and int&. Doing it in one class works:

template <class T>
class unified_class
{
public:
    virtual void f(T &i){}
    virtual void f(T &&i) {}
};

calling:

unified_class<int> u;
u.f(8); // going to the second method
int a = 9;
u.f(a); // going to the first method

but when I'm trying to split it between two classes, something weird is going on:

template <class T>
class base_class
{
public:
    virtual void f(T &&i) { /* it never reaches here*/}
};

template <class T>
class derived_class : public base_class<T>
{
public:
    using base_class<T>::f;
    virtual void f(T &i){}
};

Calling the same function calls from before, results in calling derived class's f() in both cases.

Do I miss something?

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3  
what compiler do you use? I compile fine with gcc 4.6.3. –  user2k5 May 6 '12 at 3:19
    
I'm using Visual Studio 2010 –  wolfovercats May 6 '12 at 3:27

3 Answers 3

I'm not seeing the problem with g++ 4.6.3. This is the code I used:

#include <iostream>

using std::cerr;

template <class T>
class base_class
{
public:
    virtual void f(T &&i) { cerr << "base_class\n"; }
};

template <class T>
class derived_class : public base_class<T>
{
public:
    using base_class<T>::f;
    virtual void f(T &i) { cerr << "derived_class\n";  }
};

int main(int argc,char **argv)
{
  derived_class<int> u;
  u.f(8); // going to the second method
  int a = 9;
  u.f(a); // going to the first method
}

and I got this result:

base_class
derived_class
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Running your code with Visual Studio, I get: derived_class derived_class –  wolfovercats May 6 '12 at 3:31

If you're really seeing the result you say you are with the code you've posted then this is definitely a compiler bug. You should not be able to call f(T&) with a constant when T is "int". Even if there were some sort of hiding going on, and I think the using takes care of that, the program should utterly fail to compile rather than call the wrong function.

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You'r using Visual Studio 2010 which provides this feature as extension that temporary binds to the non-const reference. That is why it is calling T& version in both cases. This compiler-extension, if at all it is, should rather be called compiler bug, because it replaces the behaviour defined by the Standard.

However, in Standard C++, the temporary object created out of the integral literal 8 must not bind to the non-const reference, and therefore the call must resolve to the function which takes T&& as argument.

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