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First-time post and python newb who has exhausted all other options. I am interested in appending selected raster properties (using the arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management(input_raster, "property_type") function) to a comma-delimited table, but am having trouble figuring out how to do this for multiple results. As an abridged example (of my actual script), I have created two 'for' loops; one for each raster property I am interested in outputting (i.e. Cell Size X, Cell Size Y). My list of rasters include S01Clip_30m through S05Clip_30m. My goal is to create a .txt file that should look something like this:

RasterName, CellSizeX, CellSizeY
S01Clip_30m, 88.9372, 88.9375
S02Clip_30m, 88.9374, 88.9371

The code I have so far is below (with some uncertain, botched syntax at the bottom). When I run it, I get this result:

S05Clip_30m, 88.9374
(last raster in the list, CellSizeY)

I appreciate any help you can provide on the crucial bottom code block.

Thanks so much,
Dre

import arcpy
from arcpy import env
env.workspace = ('C:\\StudyAreas\\Aggregates.gdb')
InFolder = ('C:\\dre\\python\\tables')
OutputFile = open(InFolder + '\\' + 'RasterProps.txt', 'a')
rlist = arcpy.ListRasters('*','*')
for grid in rlist:
    if grid[-8:] == "Clip_30m":
        result = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management(grid,'CELLSIZEX')
        CellSizeX = result.getOutput(0)
for grid in rlist:
    if grid[-8:] == "Clip_30m":
        result = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management(grid,'CELLSIZEY')
        CellSizeY = result.getOutput(0)
> I know the syntax below is incorrect, but I know there are *some* elements that 
> should be included based on other example scripts that I have...
> if result.getOutput(0) == CellSizeX:
>     coltype = CellSizeX
> elif result.getOutput(0) == CellSizeY:
>     coltype = CellSizeY
> r = ''.join(grid)
> colname = r[0:]
> OutputFile.writelines(colname+','+coltype+'\n')
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

After receiving help from another Q&A forum on my script, I am now providing the answer to my own GIS-related question to close this thread (and move to gis.stackexchange :) - thanks to L.Yip's comment). Here is the final corrected script which outputs my two raster properties (Cell Size in X-direction, Cell Size in Y-direction) for a list of rasters into a .txt file:

import arcpy
from arcpy import env
env.workspace = ('C:\\StudyAreas\\Aggregates.gdb')
InFolder = ('C:\\dre\\python\\tables')
OutputFile = open(InFolder + '\\' + 'RasterProps.txt', 'a')
rlist = arcpy.ListRasters('*','*')
for grid in rlist:
    if grid[-8:] == "Clip_30m":
        resultX = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management(grid,'CELLSIZEX')
        CellSizeX = resultX.getOutput(0)
        resultY = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management(grid,'CELLSIZEY')
        CellSizeY = resultY.getOutput(0)
OutputFile.write(grid + ',' + str(CellSizeX) + ',' + str(CellSizeY) + '\n')
OutputFile.close()

My results after running the script:
S01Clip_30m,88.937158083333,88.9371580833333
S02Clip_30m,88.937158083333,88.937158083333
S03Clip_30m,88.9371580833371,88.9371580833333
S04Clip_30m,88.9371580833308,88.937158083333
S05Clip_30m,88.9371580833349,88.937158083333

Thanks!

share|improve this answer
    
For what it's worth, the probable reason for not getting any answers on your question is because none of us know what a "raster property" is. Using my magic crystal ball I think you're talking about something GIS-related - applying the [[gis]] tag might have helped. Also, "there's a stack exchange for that!": gis.stackexchange.com. –  Li-aung Yip May 7 '12 at 17:40
    
Ah, this was very helpful - thank you. Being a new user, it was hard for me to gauge what level of detail and what context I should be providing. I knew Stack Overflow was big umbrella, so your suggestion to use gis.stackexchange is immensely helpful. Thanks agian. –  Dre May 7 '12 at 17:48
    
No worries. StackOverflow is indeed a big umbrella, but the flip side is that we aren't good at specialties. Using the right tags helps draw the attention of the experts you're after, but often the better way is to just go to the appropriate stack exchange where they're hanging out all the time. :) –  Li-aung Yip May 7 '12 at 17:51

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