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I'm trying to implement a merge sort algorithm for arraylists of strings, but i can't seem to find the bug which is screwing up the ordering of the arraylist.

private static void sort(java.util.ArrayList<String> a)
{

   // End recursion
   if (a.size() < 2)
   {
      return;
   }


   int mid = a.size() / 2;


   java.util.ArrayList<String> left = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();


   int i;

   for (i = 0; i < mid; i++)
   {

      left.add(a.remove(i));

   }


   java.util.ArrayList<String> right = new java.util.ArrayList<String>();

   // Copy the second half to the "right"
   for ( ; i < a.size(); i++)
   {
      right.add(a.remove(i));
   }


   sort(left);
   sort(right);

   merge(a, left, right);
}

private static void merge(java.util.ArrayList<String> result, java.util.ArrayList<String> left,java.util.ArrayList<String> right)
{
   int i, l, r;

   i = l = r = 0;


   while (l < left.size() && r < right.size())
   {
      if ((left.get(l)).compareTo(right.get(r)) < 0)
      {
         result.add(left.get(l));
         l++;
      }
      else
      {
         result.add(right.get(r));
         r++;
      }

      i++;
   }


   while (l < left.size())
   {
      result.add(left.get(l));
      l++;
      i++;
   }

   // Append rest of the values in the right half, if any...
   while (r < right.size())
   {
      result.add(right.get(r));
      r++;
      i++;
   }  
}  
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It looks like homework, and you don't tell us what you have tried or what the issue is... –  tonio May 6 '12 at 7:40
    
Actually I told you what the issue is if you read my statement. I say "can't seem to find the bug which is screwing up the ordering of the arraylist." In other words THe array list is not being ordered properly. Its an array list of strings so obviously the strings are not in alphabetical order. ALso I bet you say it looks like homework to every new poster. Anyways what do you want me to tell you for what I have tried? Its pretty useless telling what ive tried since a lot of it is flat out wrong since im a relatively new programmer. –  Bob the builder May 6 '12 at 7:52
    
Because for sorting an array of Strings, one would use Collections.sort or simply put the Strings in a TreeSet if it is sensible to get the duplicates removed, unless the assignment says to implement merge sort or there is a good reason to roll your own sort. Which you didn't mention. –  tonio May 6 '12 at 7:59
    
Fair enough, I should have mentioned that I am doing this for educational purposes. I know I could just use the java standard library, but I'm trying to fully understand the logic behind the merge sort. BEst way to learn it is to implement it myself. –  Bob the builder May 6 '12 at 8:04
    
Sure. So what is the issue? Is the input list returned unchanged, or is it only partially ordered ? What have you tried to find the issue ? Does it work fine for some inputs ? Are all inputs elements returned ? –  tonio May 6 '12 at 8:05
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1 Answer

The issue is in the sort function.

What happens when you use a.remove(i) ? Element at index i gets removed from the array, so the element that was previously at index i+1 is now at index i, and the array size is decremented. If you then do i++, and again a.remove(i), you will skip one element in the array.

In your sort function, when calling merge, you should check that a.size() == 0. You will see it is not always the case. The merge function seems fine, but your array splitting is incorrect: you are forgetting that using remove(int i) changes the array; its size and the indexes of its elements.

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