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Let us say I have the following text:

name is test1 and age is test2 end
name is test3 and age is test4 end
name is test5 and age is test6 end
name is test7 and age is test8 end

I am grepping for test1, test2, ... as follows:

-bash$ grep -o -P "is .*? and|is .*? end" test
is test1 and
is test2 end
is test3 and
is test4 end
is test5 and
is test6 end
is test7 and
is test8 end

Is there a way I can prepend some text to the matched pattern? I am looking for an output like this:

STRING1:is test1 and
STRING2:is test2 end
STRING1:is test3 and
STRING2:is test4 end
STRING1:is test5 and
STRING2:is test6 end
STRING1:is test7 and
STRING2:is test8 end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use sed in a pipeline (admittedly it's not very clean):

$ grep -o -P "is .*? and|is .*? end" test | sed '/and$/s/^/STRING1:/; /end$/s/^/STRING2:/'
STRING1:is test1 and
STRING2:is test2 end
STRING1:is test3 and
STRING2:is test4 end
STRING1:is test5 and
STRING2:is test6 end
STRING1:is test7 and
STRING2:is test8 end

The /.nd$/ before each substitution restricts the substitution to acting on lines that match that regex.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thank you for your time. Actually, my only concern is if the number of regexes increase, then I need to repeat everything in sed isn't it? Or am I missing anything? And there are instances where the ending word is not so clear. What I am trying to achieve is to find a way to "label" what grep is finding. –  Legend May 6 '12 at 8:04
    
If you have an arbitrary string for each match then any solution will require you to repeat everything. If, however, there is a sensible algorithmic relationship you might be able to write an awk (or Python or Perl) script that computes it without having to write everything out. Also, isn't the matched line itself a label enough? (Also also, if the ending word isn't enough, you can just put the entire regex in the sed script, possibly with some changes to account for the differences between sed and grep.) –  dbaupp May 6 '12 at 8:15
    
Thank You! That helps. –  Legend May 6 '12 at 8:27

I pipe the output of grep to awk to fulfill your need:

grep -o -P "is .*? and|is .*? end" test | \
awk -v a=STRING1: -v b=STRING2: "/and$/ {print a\$0} /end$/ {print b\$0}"
share|improve this answer
    
You should use /and$/ and /end$/ to ensure that they are at the end of the line, otherwise something like is end and will cause incorrect output. –  dbaupp May 6 '12 at 8:11
    
@dbaupp Yes, you are right. I think this is just a example, you can adjust it to any other pattern. –  Li Dong May 6 '12 at 8:16

Since you want to manipulate and not just select text, sed would be a better tool for the job than grep.

It is simple enough to construct a regex that performs the substitution you want. You have two substitutions, so you can use two expressions (-e). To operate only on lines that match (as happens with your grep example), use sed -n and the p action to print only lines that match. The tricky part is that you want to operate on the same line multiple times, but when you perform the first substitution, you lose the rest of the string for the second substitution. For example, the following is close to what you want, but the second expression will never match, because the first expression deletes the string that the second expression matches:

sed -n -e 's/.*\(is .* and\).*/STRING1:\1/p' -e 's/.*\(is .* end\)/STRING2:\1/p'
STRING1:is test1 and
STRING1:is test3 and
STRING1:is test5 and
STRING1:is test7 and

To get around this problem, you can use the h and g sed commands to copy the pattern space (the input line) into a hold buffer (h) and to copy it back to the pattern space for the next sed command (g):

sed -n -e 'h;s/.*\(is .* and\).*/STRING1:\1/p' -e 'g;s/.*\(is .* end\)/STRING2:\1/p'
STRING1:is test1 and
STRING2:is test2 end
STRING1:is test3 and
STRING2:is test4 end
STRING1:is test5 and
STRING2:is test6 end
STRING1:is test7 and
STRING2:is test8 end

Before the substitution in the first expression is performed, the line is saved in the hold buffer. The second expression first loads the pattern buffer with the hold buffer so the second substitution can work.

You could combine those two separate expressions into one, but I think that makes it harder to read:

sed -n -e 'h;s/.*\(is .* and\).*/STRING1:\1/p;g;s/.*\(is .* end\).*/STRING2:\1/p'
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