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I have a Java model similar to:

public class Country {
    @Id private String id;
    private CurrencyId currencyId;
    private List<Province> provinceList;
    ...
}

public class Province {
    @Id private String id;
    private Gobernor gobernorId;
    private List<City> cityList;
    ...
}

public class City {
    @Id private String id;
    private String name;
    ...
}

I want to store that data using objectify. However, as Country data might change, I also want to store the date the Country data has been stored, so I think I should store an entity such as:

public class CountryListEntity {
    @Id private String id;
    private List<Country> countryList;
    private Date storeDate;
}

Note I will only have one entity of kind CountryListEntity with the Id "root", if I can store it like that. I know very little about both how google apps stores data and how objectify works. I've tried many combinations of @Embedded, but I got many errors, i.e.

Cannot place array or collection properties inside @Embedded arrays or collections

Can anyone tell me how to define these classes? A snippet of the code needed to store and retrieve this "root" entity, would be highly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand meaning of CountryListEntity. You want to add Date of Country-object modification? In this case @PrePersist annotation from Objectify could help. –  Vadim Ponomarev May 6 '12 at 8:46
    
It's not clear what you are trying to do here. Do you want to store Country, Province, City as separate entities with links between them? Do you want to embed this information in a single entity? You should read the Concepts document in Objectify and the Storing Data documentation in the GAE SDK. –  stickfigure May 6 '12 at 16:16
    
@stickfigure I actually don't care if they're separate entities or not. I'm going to store/load all data at once, so as I read it was possible to store Lists, I thought storing a List of Countries would also mean storing the Provinces and the Cities. If this is not possible it's still ok to store them as separate entities. –  Mosty Mostacho May 6 '12 at 16:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

@Embedded collections are transformed into a series of collection fields in the low-level Entity. That's why one level embedding is all you can do.

If you are going to store/load all data at once and if your entities are as simple as the ones in your example you can put @Serialized annotation for your lists inside @Embedded lists.

You can find out more from this discussion.

The problem with this approach is that your low-level embeddings won't be able to be indexed.

public class CountryListEntity {
    @Id private String id;

    @Embedded 
    private List<Country> countryList;

    private Date storeDate;
}

public class Country implements Serializable {
    private String id;
    private CurrencyId currencyId;

    @Serialized
    private List<Province> provinceList;
    // ...
}

public class Province implements Serializable {
    private String id;
    private Gobernor gobernorId;

    @Serialized
    private List<City> cityList;
    // ...
}

public class City implements Serializable {
    private String id;
    private String name;
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to avoid @Serialized, but it seems there is no other way (apart from storing each entity separately). Just a few comments about the code. All the @Id but the one from CountryListEntity are not necessary. Additionally, all classes but CountryListEntity must implement Serializable. At least that is what the documentation says and after following those steps this is working fine. Thanks! –  Mosty Mostacho May 6 '12 at 23:12
    
Yes, really sorry for not mentioning Serializable interface, I've updated the answer as you suggested, thanks. –  turan May 7 '12 at 9:08

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