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I was building a bit of code that would trim off any non-digit entries from the start and end of a string, I had a very confusing issue with the following bit of code:

def String_Trim(Raw_String):
        if Raw_String[0].isdigit() == False:
            New_String = Raw_String[1:]
            String_Trim(New_String)
        elif Raw_String[-1].isdigit() == False:
            New_String = Raw_String[:-1]
            String_Trim(New_String)
        else:
            print Raw_String
            return Raw_String

print(String_Trim('ab19fsd'))

The initial printing of Raw_String works fine and displays the value that I want (19), but for some reason, the last line trying to print the return value of String_Trim returns a None. What exactly is python doing here and how can I fix it? Any other comments about improving my code would also be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Please have a look at python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 - it suggests a different naming style (lowercase_with_underscores) and you should avoid == True and ´== False´ (they are not necessary, if foo and if not foo are the proper ways to check a boolean for true/false) –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 8:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use regex for this. Recursion for trimming a string is really not a good idea:

import re

def trim_string(string):
  return re.sub(r'^([^0-9]+)(.*?)([^0-9]+)$', r'\2', string)

To break it down, the regex (r'^([^0-9]+)(.*?)([^0-9]+)$') is like so:

  • ^ matches the start of a string.
  • ([^0-9]+) matches a group of consecutive non-digit characters.
  • (.*?) matches a group of stuff (non-greedy).
  • ([^0-9]+) matches another group of consecutive non-digit characters.
  • $ matches the end of the string.

The replacement string, r'\2', just says to replace the matched string with only the second group, which is the stuff between the two groups of non-digit characters.


But if you're really sure you want to use your existing solution, you need to understand how recursion actually works. When you call return foo, the function returns foo as its output. If you don't call return, you return None automatically.

That being said, you need to return in every case of the recursion process, not just at the end:

def String_Trim(Raw_String):
    if Raw_String[0].isdigit() == False:
        New_String = Raw_String[1:]
        return String_Trim(New_String)
    elif Raw_String[-1].isdigit() == False:
        New_String = Raw_String[:-1]
        return String_Trim(New_String)
    else:
        print Raw_String
        return Raw_String
share|improve this answer
    
Why is recursion for trimming a string so bad? –  Slater Tyranus May 6 '12 at 8:17
1  
It's needlessly complicated. –  Blender May 6 '12 at 8:20
1  
not to mention very slow in python –  Shep May 6 '12 at 8:20
    
@SlaterTyranus: And you could get a stack overflow exception if there are a lot of characters that need trimming. –  Mark Byers May 6 '12 at 8:20
3  
Regex usage isn't a privilege, it should be a last resort. Raw_String.strip('abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz') is cleaner. –  JosefAssad May 6 '12 at 8:44

You return a value in only one case inside StringTrim. Add return in front of the recursive calls:

        return String_Trim(New_String)

That should fix it.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried it, but sadly it still returns Nones –  Slater Tyranus May 6 '12 at 8:24
1  
Understood and implemented now, thank you. Moot due to the changing of the code, but still useful for improving my coding abilities. –  Slater Tyranus May 6 '12 at 8:31
    
It doesn't return Nones; this is the correct answer considering that the question was not requesting alternate approaches to the recursive solution but was asking why te recursive solution didn't work. –  JosefAssad May 6 '12 at 8:33

If I understand your question correctly, you want to return only the digits from a string; because "trim of any non digits from the start and end" to me sounds like "return only numbers".

If that's correct, you can do this:

''.join(a for a in 'abc19def' if a.isdigit())
share|improve this answer
    
That'll strip out non-digits surrounded by digits in the string. I'm not sure if it's just a typo in the question, but the OP specifically needed a solution that stripped out non-digits from both sides of the string. –  Blender May 6 '12 at 8:28
    
You have a point, but how do you know how long a string is? Or for that matter what is the "start" and "end". After reading this and displays the value that I want (19) - I figured I'd throw it out. –  Burhan Khalid May 6 '12 at 8:33
    
Blender is correct, this is basically for throwing away useless information in a genetic algorithm, so this would sadly not work. Thanks anyway though. –  Slater Tyranus May 6 '12 at 8:34
    
@BurhanKhalid: What does string theory have to do with string objects in Python? –  Blender May 6 '12 at 8:35
    
@Blender - err .. sorry about that one, it was a wrong paste. Edited. –  Burhan Khalid May 6 '12 at 8:37

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