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I have the following code:

List<MultiServiceRequestMember> _memberList = new List<MultiServiceRequestMember>();
var type = Type.GetType(svc.NotificationClassName); <- this is a string of the class name.
MultiServiceRequestMember newMember = (MultiServiceRequestMember)Activator.CreateInstance(type);

_memberList.add(newMember);

The MultServiceRequestMember is a base type and I want to assign values to properties specific to type. My question is: How do I cast newMember to type and access its properties?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

How do I cast newMember to type and access it's properties?

You can't cast it, because you don't know the specific type at compile-time. If you did, you wouldn't need reflection in the first place!

You'll have to set the properties by reflection too:

// TODO: Checking that you managed to get the property, that's it's writable etc.
var property = type.GetProperty("PropertyName");
property.SetValue(newMember, "new value", null);
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Thank you! This should work well. Checking it now. –  Elad Lachmi May 6 '12 at 9:07
    
@EladLachmi: I'm quite interested how your code will look like with this approach. Maybe I'm missing something but I think you will end up performing same conditional logic as described in my answer. –  empi May 6 '12 at 9:14
    
@empi: It depends where the property names and values come from. We don't know that at the moment. If they're (say) stored in a database, there shouldn't need to be any conditional code. –  Jon Skeet May 6 '12 at 9:18
    
@JonSkeet: I agree with you - if there is a convention (e.g. map every field with the same name) or some external mapping definition exists (e.g. pairs field A maps to field B) it is possible to do it. However, if mapping is completely arbitrary, then using reflection doesn't change anything. –  empi May 6 '12 at 9:47
1  
@EladLachmi: Do the properties depend on the generic type? If not, you might want to create a non-generic type between the abstract class and the generic class - or just move the properties up to the abstract class. –  Jon Skeet May 6 '12 at 12:04

You will have to change the code to look like this:

List<MultiServiceRequestMember> _memberList = new List<MultiServiceRequestMember>();
var type = Type.GetType(svc.NotificationClassName);
MultiServiceRequestMember newMember = null;
if (type == typeof(MultiServiceRequestMemberA))
{
    newMember = new MultiServiceRequestMemberA();
    //set specific properties
}
else if (type == typeof(MultiServiceRequestMemberB)) //etc.
{
    //...
}
else
{
    //throw or some default
}

_memberList.add(newMember);

However, it looks like code smell. I guess you're trying to initialize an object based on some other object (let's call it NotificationInfo). Then instead of code that looks like this:

if (type == typeof(MultiServiceRequestMemberA))
{
    newMember = new MultiServiceRequestMemberA();
    newMember.A = notificationInfo.A;
}

Maybe should think of following design:

class MultiServiceRequestMember
{
    public virtual void Initialize(NotificationInfo notificationInfo) //or abstract if you wish
    {
    }
}

class MultiServiceRequestMemberA : MultiServiceRequestMember
{
    public override void Initialize(NotificationInfo notificationInfo)
    {
        base.Initialize(notificationInfo);
        this.A = notificationInfo.A;
    }
}

And then you will be able to leave your previous code and just call Initialize.

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I don't think this is a good solution, since it will not scale very well to N different classes. I already have the type as a string, no sense in not using that... Sorry. –  Elad Lachmi May 6 '12 at 9:07
    
The first approach is so smelly I wouldn't mention it at all. But the Initialize approach is much, much better. –  Irfy May 6 '12 at 9:07
1  
OTOH, the smelly approach cannot be used at all if the set of potential implementors of base class is not known at all. The Initialize approach can. –  Irfy May 6 '12 at 9:08
    
@EladLachmi: if you want to set specific properties how would you set them without performing some conditional logic and checking the type? –  empi May 6 '12 at 9:08
    
I agree. The first approach is not a good one IMHO. The Initialize approach could work, but is not needed in my case. Thank you anyway. –  Elad Lachmi May 6 '12 at 10:58

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