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I am using 'live' function to do some on-click stuff on table rows, i.e.

$("tr").live('click',function() {
      alert('Some table row is clicked');
});

I want to find out which row is clicked and using if-else, give some custom alert based upon that. Can anyone tell me how to do it?

Thanks a lot.

EDIT 1:

Is there a way by which I can refer to the elements of the clicked row inside the function?

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5  
$(this).index(); –  xFortyFourx May 6 '12 at 8:57
2  
@xFortyFourx: Had you posted your comment as answer, I would have accepted it. Exactly what I wanted! –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:00

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted
$("tr").live('click', function() {
    if (this.id == "foo") {
        alert('the tr with the foo id was clicked');
    }
});​

If you want to check which row number, use index:

$("tr").live('click', function() {
   if $(this).index() === 2) {
     alert('The third row was clicked'); // Yes the third as it's zero base index
   }
});​

Live demo


Update:

$("tr").live('click', function() {
    // "this" is the clicked <tr> element
    // $(this).find('td span') is the spans inside a td inside the clicked <tr>
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 !!!!! Thanks a lot! –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:08
    
Thanks for answer. I had another question. Is there a way by which I can refer to the elements of the clicked row inside the function? –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:14
1  
@Learner. I saw the update and already updated mine... –  gdoron May 6 '12 at 9:16

First you shouldn't use .live() ever :)

why you shouldn't use .live()

you can use instead .delegate()
Example

$(document).delegate("tr", "click", function(e) {
 // write your code here 
});
share|improve this answer
    
Unless you use jQuery < 1.4.3... –  gdoron May 6 '12 at 9:05
    
Right , but even you use JQuery < 1.4.3 it's a bad practice to use .live() specially if you use it aloot in your code . –  Marc J May 6 '12 at 9:08
1  
Thanks Rayan, +1 for the link. –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:09
1  
Btw, do you mean "Ryan Gigs"? :) –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:09
1  
No , my name is "Rayan" and in the same time i like Ryan Giggs :)) –  Marc J May 6 '12 at 9:12

Let me suggest you some easy way. Let us suppose this is your table

<table>
<tr id = '1' class="tr">...</tr>
<tr id = '2' class="tr">...</tr>
<tr id = '3' class="tr">...</tr>
</table>

Place this in your JQuery code

$(function(){

$('.tr').click(function(){
var row_no = $(this).attr('id');
alert('Row number '+row_no+' was clicked');
});

});

Hope this helps you

share|improve this answer
1  
You can simply use this.id –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 9:14
    
Thanks!! Even I am new to JQuery –  Anwar May 6 '12 at 9:16
    
That's not really jQuery - this is the plain DOM element, and id is a property every DOM element has. So in this case the direct way to access it is shorter and faster. Besides that, if you prefer to use the jQuery way even to access that property, use prop instead of attr. attr has some magic to detect if you actually want a property instead of an attribute so it's slower. Usually .prop() is what you want - there are few cases where you really need .attr() –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 9:18
    
Ok... will keep that in mind.. thanx. –  Anwar May 6 '12 at 9:22
    
I've given you +1 for suggesting this, but I would really suggest not using numeric ID values. –  Spudley May 17 '12 at 20:46

Demo : http://jsfiddle.net/zJUuX/

HTML :

<table>
    <tr><td>hey</td></tr>
    <tr><td>hi</td></tr>
</table>

Jquery:

$("table tr").click(function(){
    messages( $(this).index() );
});

    function messages(index) {
        switch(index){
            case 0:
                alert("you clicked 1st row");
                break;
            case 1:
                alert("you clicked 2nd row");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }
        $("table tr").eq(index).css("background","#ff0");
        $("table tr").eq(index).find("a"); //will find all the nested anchor tags.
    }

There you go Learner, now I shall accept my virtual points :D. Have fun.

share|improve this answer
    
+ 1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:05
    
Thanks for answer. I had another question. Is there a way by which I can refer to the elements of the clicked row inside the function? –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 9:14
    
$("table tr").eq(index); <- that will get you the selected row, inside the function "messages()" –  xFortyFourx May 6 '12 at 9:19

You have access to the clicked element using this.

offtopic: $.live is deprecated since 1.7, you should be using $.on. See here for more info.

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As an improvement on gdoron's answer jQuery's live() is deprecated, try delegate or on:

$("#mytable").delegate("tr", "click", function(e) {
  if (this == "foo") {
     ....
  }
});
share|improve this answer
    
If you cannot use .on() there is no reason to use a delegate on the document instead of .live(). It was only deprecated in favor of .on(), not in favor of .delegate() (which is also deprecated since .on() was added) –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 9:11
    
@ThiefMaster. delegate wasn't deprecated (yet...) –  gdoron May 6 '12 at 9:12
    
Well ok, it's just been superseded. But I'd say if you have 1.7 you can treat it like it's actually deprecated. –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 9:15
    
@ThiefMaster, from the documentation: "As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. Use .on() to attach event handlers. Users of older versions of jQuery should use .delegate() in preference to .live()." –  miguelr May 6 '12 at 9:15
    
Yes, because using delegate on an element as close as possible to the elements you want the events from is better. But adding a delegate to document is actually the same as adding a live event. –  ThiefMaster May 6 '12 at 9:16
//Even row
$("tr:even").click(function() {
    alert('Even');
});

//Odd row
$("tr:odd").click(function() {
    alert('Odd');
});​
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