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Today I looked into the header source code of boost::asio::ip::address and found the following lines:

class address
{
  // I removed some irrelevant lines here...

  public:

  /// Compare addresses for ordering.
  friend bool operator>=(const address& a1, const address& a2)
  {
    return !(a1 < a2);
  }
};

Now I know what friend is for but I had never seen it followed by a definition, inside a class definition.

So my question is, what does this friend declaration do ? It seems to me that operator>= is not a method here, however there is no static keyword either.

Does friend replace static in this particular case ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes and no. It doesn't replace static because you don't need to qualify the name when you call the operator. It kind of does as you don't need a class instance to call it on.

It's like declaring the operator outside the class:

class address
{
  // I removed some irrelevant lines here...

  public:

  /// Compare addresses for ordering.
  friend bool operator>=(const address& a1, const address& a2);
};

inline bool operator>=(const address& a1, const address& a2)
{
   return !(a1 < a2);
}

You can access private and protected methods from the class.

Think of overloading the stream operator inside the class, the same technique can be applied.

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1  
Thanks for your answer. But what about the namespace of the function ? Does it have the same namespace the containing class it is declared into ? –  ereOn May 6 '12 at 9:37
    
@ereOn never thought of that. Since you need a class to use the operator, it will automatically go to the required namespace, but I can't tell if the operator itself is in the namespace. –  Luchian Grigore May 6 '12 at 9:39
    
For all practical purposes it will behave as if it had been declared in the namespace surrounding the class. (Let's forget about corner cases, like templated friends that are never used...). –  Bo Persson May 6 '12 at 10:09
1  
@ereOn what @Bo has said, except that the operator is not visible except by ADL. So you need something associated to "address" to invoke it. For example int main() { string x; x >= 10; } will not invoke operator>= even if your address class is convertible from both int and string. The reason is because neither of string and 10 have address as their associated class. But if you do address x; x >= 10; it works because the address argument makes the operator>= visible (-> ADL) and then both arguments are passed/converted to address const&. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 6 '12 at 10:28
    
hm.. and what about class method bool operator>=(const address&)? is it neccessary to do friend operator>= (const address& one, const address& two) instead of bool operator>=(const address& one)? –  gaussblurinc May 6 '12 at 10:30

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