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HTML:

<table>
<tr class="not-counted"><th>Heading 1</th></tr>
<tr><td>key1</td><td>val1</td></tr>
<tr><td>key2</td><td>val2</td></tr>
<tr class="not-counted"><th>Heading 2</th></tr>
<tr><td>key3</td><td>val3</td></tr>
</table>​

CSS style:

table tr:not(.not-counted):nth-child(even) td {
    background-color: gray;
}​

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/MartyIX/fdtpL/

I hoped that TR containing key3 would have grey background too but it does not work. How to write the CSS properly?

Thanks!

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1  
This gets asked very, very often. You can combine pseudo-classes, but they do not work the way you expect. –  BoltClock May 6 '12 at 9:32
1  
tr containing key3 is "odd". –  KBN May 6 '12 at 9:32
1  
BoltClock: Well, obviously they don't. –  MartyIX May 6 '12 at 9:33
1  
your :nth-child is not part of :not => it will select even elements and key3 is odd as mentioned by xFortyFourx –  Aprillion May 6 '12 at 9:57

2 Answers 2

You want to style in CSS a table with zebra rows with an unknown number of rows not styled (or hidden, same result), these unstyled rows being at any position in the table.
Each remaining row to be styled is preceded by an unknown number of unstyled rows at odd position and an unknown number of unstyled rows at even position in whatever order.

Your particular need isn't stylable in CSS2.1 or CSS3, unless you add a constraint.
By example, if you know how much unstyled rows you could encounter, than the 2 fiddles in my following twit will do the trick: https://twitter.com/#!/PhilippeVay/statuses/166243438436687873 This is CSS from hell, don't ever do that in production! As briefly stated, jQuery/Sizzle and its pseudo :visible would be far superior. Or even better, add a class server-side to each row you want to style.

Other fiddle with your example: http://jsfiddle.net/yBKqy/
You can see that it works till the row next to your second unstyled row. The remaining rows below are both preceded by an odd unstyled row and an even unstyled row; the rule that apply will be the last one declared. AFAIK no way to apply one or another in a meaningful way. If you add weight to the first selector, it'll always apply. If you don't the last one will always apply.

If you know how much rows can follow an unstyled row before there's another unstyled row or the end of the table, here's another fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/yBKqy/3/
This particular example works with no more than 4 rows in a row but not 6. You can make it works with 6 but it'd fail with 7, etc

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I solved the problem with the help of dummy lines:

HTML

<table>
<tr><th>Heading 1</th></tr>
<tr style="display:none;"><th></th></tr> <!-- dummy line -->
<tr><td>key1</td><td>val1</td></tr>
<tr><td>key2</td><td>val2</td></tr>
<tr><th>Heading 2</th></tr>
<tr style="display:none;"><th></th></tr> <!-- dummy line -->
<tr><td>key3</td><td>val3</td></tr>
</table>​

CSS

table tr:nth-child(even) td {
    background-color: gray;
}​

Demo

http://jsfiddle.net/MartyIX/fdtpL/3/

I'm not really proud of it but I've lost too much time with that.

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