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If I write a program like the following one, g++ and visual studio have the courtesy of warning me that the local variable a is never used :

int main()
{
    int a; // An unused variable? Warning! Warning!
}

If I remove the unused variable (to make the compiler happy), it leaves me with the following program :

int main()
{
    // An empty main? That's fine.
}

Now, I am left with a useless program.

Maybe I am missing something, but, if an unused variable is bad enough to raise a warning, why would an empty program be ok?

The example above is pretty simple. But in real life, if I have a big program with an empty main (because I forgot to put anything in it). Then having a warning should be a good thing, isn't it.

Maybe I am missing an option in g++ or visual studio that can raise a warning/error when the main is empty?

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1  
You cannot have a big program with an empty main! –  Vincenzo Pii May 6 '12 at 9:50
1  
When I write "big program", I don't mean "a big binary", I mean with a "lot's of line of code". If you have a lot's of classes but that you forgot to put anything in the main, then you have a big program, with an empty main. –  olchauvin May 6 '12 at 9:52
3  
In C++ you can have a program do a million things when it has a empty main. Static initializers can execute any code before main is even called. –  x4u May 6 '12 at 9:56
1  
The empty program isn't useless. It does nothing, successfully. This is such a vastly important thing that it's even a mandatory part of the Posix standard (whose implementation is called true). –  Kerrek SB May 6 '12 at 11:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The reason for this is simple, if there is no return statement in main it implicitly returns EXIT_SUCCESS, as defined by the standard.

So an empty main is fine, no return needed, no function calls needed, nothing.


To answer the question why GCC doesn't warn you is because warnings are there to help you with common mistakes. Leaving a variable unused can lead to confusing errors, and code bloat.

However forgetting entirely to write a main function isn't a common mistake by anything but a beginner and isn't worth warning about (because it's entirely legal as well).

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fixed s/ERROR/EXIT/ for you –  Christoph May 6 '12 at 9:52
    
If test.c contains int main(void){}, then gcc -Wall test.c gives me a warning--control reaches end of non-void function. But g++ -Wall test.c (or test.cpp) doesn't emit a warning. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' May 6 '12 at 11:13
3  
@Catcall: Prior to C99, C didn't have an implicit return from main. When you use gcc, you're compiling the code as C, hence the warning observed. –  Stuart Golodetz May 6 '12 at 11:16
    
@StuartGolodetz: I know. The question and most of the answers seemed to jumble C and C++ together to the point that I'm not sure which they're talking about. (In this answer, gcc does warn you, for example.) I was just trying to be explicit. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' May 6 '12 at 12:05

I suspect a lot of it is that compilers generally try to warn about things that are potential problems, but aren't necessarily apparent.

Now it's certainly true that if all your main contains a definition of a variable that's never used, that's fairly apparent -- but if you've defined 16 variables (or whatever) and one of them is no longer used, that may not be so obvious.

In the case of main containing nothing, I suppose the same could happen with an empty main -- for example, you could have a whole web of #ifdef/#elif/etc., that led to main being entirely empty for some particular platform. I'm pretty sure I've never run across this though, and I'm pretty sure I've never heard of anybody else seeing it either. At least to me, that suggests that it probably doesn't arise often enough in practice for most people to care much about the possibility.

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if an unused variable is bad enough to raise a warning, why would an empty program be ok?

First of all, an empty main does not equal an empty program. There could be static objects with non-trivial constructors/destructors. These would get invoked irrespective of whether main is empty.

Secondly, one could think of lots and lots of potential errors that a compiler could warn about, but most compilers don't. I think this particular one doesn't come up very often (and takes seconds to figure out). I therefore don't see a compelling case for specifically diagnosing it.

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When I was cleaning up inherited C code that comprised the customized runner for Informix 4GL, I fixed every warning having set the warning flag to catch everything, and there were lots of warnings.

I haven't used Visual C++ in a long time. Can't VC++ be configured to flag the most severe warnings? It is probably not the default setting, but one you have to change.

It is possible then that at least the unused variable would be flagged.

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In a global sense int main() is just a definition of the main function of the program which returns SUCCESS when finishes. The main function is the point by where all C++ programs start their execution, independently of its location within the source code.

So this:

int main()
{
    // An empty main? That's fine.

    // notice that the "return 0;" part is here by default, whether you wrote it or not 
}

is just a definition of a function which returns admissible value. So everything is ok, that's why the compiler is silent.

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