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I'm trying to differentiate between listeners and adapters.

Are they pretty much the same but in listeners you have to implement all the methods in the interface, but with adapters you have an option to only implement the methods you need so the code is cleaners and easier to read?

I also got told that adapters enable instantiation with only one implementation and you can't instantiate listeners, I don't fully understand this.

Can someone please explain which one is better to use and things you can do with one but you can't with the other?

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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

WindowListener is interface which force you to override all of the methods, while WindowAdapter is implementation of WindowListener and you only need to override the method(s) that you interest to deal with.

WindowListener is interface which mean you cant instantiation the WindowListener, while WindowAdapter is concrete class that you can use new operator to instantiation.

When you use WindowAdapter, the code is more clean where your class only override the method(s) that you want. For example:

WindowListener

public class CloseListener implements WindowListener {
    // im not interest  on this event, but still need to override it
    @Override
    public void windowOpened(WindowEvent e) {

    }
    // im not interest  on this event, but still need to override it    
    @Override
    public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {

    }

    @Override
    public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e) {
        System.exit(0);

    }
    // im not interest  on this event, but still need to override it    
    @Override
    public void windowIconified(WindowEvent e) {

    }
    // im not interest  on this event, but still need to override it
    @Override
    public void windowDeiconified(WindowEvent e) {

    }

}

WindowAdapter

While using adapter the code is cleaner:

// at JFrame class
addWindowListener(new CloseListener());

// reusable Close Listener
public class CloseListener extends WindowAdapter {
    @Override
    public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e) {
        System.exit(0);
    }
}

Or

addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
    @Override
    public void windowClosed(WindowEvent e) {
         System.exit(0);
     }
});

So I would recommend to use WindowAdapter, but not must follow. However, two of the API about the same just that WindowAdapter exists as convenience for creating listener objects.

EDIT:

Since WindowListener is interface, you can implement it at your JFrame subclass.

public class MainWindow extends JFrame implements WindowListener {
    // this is ok
}
public class MainWindow extends JFrame, WindowAdapter {
    // this is not allow
}

But you cant do it with WindowAdapter.

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Thanks. Do you mind also letting me know what it means by 'adapters enable instantiation with only one implementation and you can't instantiate listeners' –  orange May 6 '12 at 11:21
    
the listener interface is usually just that - an interface - so you cant create a new listener, you need to create a new instance of some class implementing this interface. adapters, on the other hand, may be instantiated directly (if they're not abstract) - but they usually do nothing by default so there's no real use-case for creating them –  radai May 6 '12 at 11:22
    
Thanks a very good answer. I still don't get why you would want to instantiate a adapter class. Examples of when this would be done will be useful. :) –  orange May 6 '12 at 11:35
    
It could make sense if you are reusing the adapter/listener to register to multiple objects. So you could for instance have a KeyAdapter that just refreshes something. And you want that behaviour on several JTextFields or so... Then you can create an instance and addKeyListener(...) that instance to all of them instead of creating multiple anonymous versions. Although I am also not exactly sure what Pau Kiat Wee meant with his statement... –  brimborium May 6 '12 at 11:39
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You can do everything with either, but if you start with the interface, your code is going to have a LOT of boilerplate. I'm sure you noticed that when you tried it out. That statement about instantiation etc. is a quite convoluted way of saying it and there's a lot of confusion of terms. You can write

c.addWindowListener(new WindowListener() {
  @Override public void windowActivated(WindowEvent arg0) { }
  @Override public void windowClosed(WindowEvent arg0) { System.exit(0); }
  @Override public void windowClosing(WindowEvent arg0) { }
  @Override public void windowDeactivated(WindowEvent arg0) { }
  @Override public void windowDeiconified(WindowEvent arg0) { }
  @Override public void windowIconified(WindowEvent arg0) { }
  @Override public void windowOpened(WindowEvent arg0) { }
});

or you can write

c.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
  @Override public void windowClosed(WindowEvent arg0) { System.exit(0); }
});

In neither case are you instantiating either WindowListener or WindowAdapter -- you are creating anonymous classes that implement WindowListener/extend WindowAdapter. BUT when you implement the interface directly, you are forced to implement ALL methods, wheras when you extend the adapter class, you can only override what you need. That class already has exactly these empty implementations that you had to write in the Listener case.

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after edit better answer –  mKorbel May 6 '12 at 11:32
    
I tend to post incrementally as I'm still writing. –  Marko Topolnik May 6 '12 at 11:33
    
I think your second code sample means to create an instance of WindowAdapter and not WindowListener –  brimborium May 6 '12 at 11:34
    
@brimborium Thanks, copypaste without enough edit :) –  Marko Topolnik May 6 '12 at 11:34
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There are several Adapter classes such as the MouseAdapter, KeyAdapter, WindowAdapter that one can extend thus avoiding writing the methods that you don't actuality need.

The thing with interfaces is that you have to write out all the methods you do not need. The Adapter class can further be Sub Classed as a way to override the method required.

http://www.cafeaulait.org/course/week7/19.html

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Listeners are used when you plan to utilize most of the interface methods. When you need to use only a few of the methods an adapter would be better b/c you would not have to override the remainder of the methods.

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