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I have a query to update a record; it looks somewhat like this:

public void SaveRecord(int TheUserID, Nullable<DateTime> TheDate,
                                                  Nullable<int> TheAction)
    {
      using DC...
      {
         var TheRecordToUpdate = (from....where ....
                                  select l).Single();

         TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate;
         TheRecordToUpdate.TheAction = TheAction;

         TheDC.SubmitChanges();

The problem is that sometimes I supply null parameters and when that's the case, I don't want to change the field in the DB. How do I use the ?? operator in linq-to-sql when the parameter is null?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

you can use the ?? operator

TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate ?? TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate ;

or if you want to write it more explicitly

if (TheDate.HasValue){
    TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate;
}

if TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate is not a nullable property however, you'll have to write

if (TheDate.HasValue){
    TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate.Value;
}
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+1 for the second option. –  leppie May 6 '12 at 12:25
    
@leppie what is wrong with the first option? –  ie. May 6 '12 at 12:29
    
From me too. Clear intent in your own code instead of relying on an implicit behaviour of something downstream. –  Tony Hopkinson May 6 '12 at 12:29
    
If they made a change to linq in terms of updating even if same, that could be a breaking change to your code (say if there was a timestamp in the record). Probably not likely in this case, but making your intent clear as a habit will save you all sorts of future problems. –  Tony Hopkinson May 6 '12 at 12:32

You could try to use the ?? operator like this:

TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate ?? TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate;

It would update the field with the existing value, if TheDate is null. The code generated by the linq designer and SQL metal contains guards against assigning the same value, so this should not trigger an update of the database:

set
{
  if ((this._TheDate != value))
  {
    this.OnTheDateChanging(value);
    this.SendPropertyChanging();
    this._TheDate = value;
    this.SendPropertyChanged("TheDate");
    this.OnTheDateChanged();
  }
}

Anyways I think that using a normal if statement is more readable:

if (TheDate != null)
{
  TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate;
}

As a side note, you're not following the normal casing conventions for variables. the TheDate parameter is usually written theDate.

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I don't feel really comfortable with editing the auto-generated code but I know it's a possibility. Thanks for the answer; upvoted in case some want/need to go that route. –  frenchie May 6 '12 at 12:30
    
@frenchie: I don't mean that you should edit the auto-generated code, just wanted to show what it looks like to point out that linq-to-sql won't update the database when the same value is reassigned. –  Anders Abel May 6 '12 at 12:31

The folowing trick should work.

TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate = TheDate ?? TheRecordToUpdate.TheDate;
TheRecordToUpdate.TheAction = TheAction ?? TheRecordToUpdate.TheAction;

If the parameters are null, then the values are updated but with the previous value, so it retains it's previous value.

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You could use ternary to update to what it is now as per @sarwar026, personally I don't like it though, it relies on no change to the data being detected by the downstream functionality. I'd just wrap it in if TheDate.HasValue etc. Can't see any value in being this clever.

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