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I have a loop that I want to exit; like this:

function MyFunction() {

  for (var i = 0; i < SomeCondition; i++) {

     if (i === SomeOtherCondition) {

        // Do some work here
        return false;
     }
  }

  SomeOtherFunction();
  SomeOtherFunction2();
}

The problem is that after the Do some work here statements executes, I want to exit the for loop but still execute the SomeOtherFunctions();

The return false statement does exit the for loop but it also exits the whole function. How do I fix this?

Thanks.

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2  
possible duplicate of How to stop a for loop? –  Felix Kling May 6 '12 at 14:56
1  
This is the sort of thing you'll learn in the early chapters of a basic JavaScript tutorial. You may want to consider something like eloquentjavascript.net in order to learn the language basics. Its second chapter teaches the break statement. –  cliffs of insanity May 6 '12 at 15:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 54 down vote accepted

You're looking for the break statement.

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1  
And a link for javascript: w3schools.com/js/js_break.asp –  Sietse May 6 '12 at 14:55
    
Ah okkkk, thanks for the answer. –  frenchie May 6 '12 at 14:55
    
why are you referring to a C# example? –  ilanco May 6 '12 at 14:55
    
@ilanco: Because I read much too fast. –  SLaks May 6 '12 at 14:59

Break - breaks the whole loop. Continue - skips a step in a loop. So it skips the code below continue;

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Either use a break or continue statement

function MyFunction() { 
  for (var i = 0; i < SomeCondition; i++) { 

     if (i === SomeOtherCondition) { 

        // Do some work here 
        break;
     } 
  } 

  SomeOtherFunction(); 
  SomeOtherFunction2(); 
} 

Or to continue processing items except for those in a condition

function MyFunction() { 
  for (var i = 0; i < SomeCondition; i++) { 

     if (i != SomeOtherCondition) continue;

     // Do some work here 
  } 

  SomeOtherFunction(); 
  SomeOtherFunction2(); 
} 
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Several people have offered break as the solution, and it is indeed the best answer to the question.

However, just for completeness, I feel I should also add that the question could be answered while retaining the return statement, by wrapping the contents of the if() condition in a closure function:

function MyFunction() {

  for (var i = 0; i < SomeCondition; i++) {

     if (i === SomeOtherCondition) {
        function() {
           // Do some work here
           return false;
        }();
     }
  }

  SomeOtherFunction();
  SomeOtherFunction2();
}

As I say, break is probably a better solution in this case, as it's the direct answer to the question and the closure does introduce some additional factors (such as changing the value of this, limiting the scope of variables introduced inside the function, etc). But it's worth offering as a solution, because it's a valuable technique to learn, if not necessarily to be used in this particular occasion then certainly for the future.

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ok, thanks. My philosophy is to keep my code simple so that it'll be easier to maintain in the future. Upvoted in case others want to take this direction. –  frenchie May 6 '12 at 17:57
    
@frenchie - you're absolutely right; that's definitely the best philosophy. break is the right answer in this case. Closures are very powerful and have many uses (most jQuery code is built on them), but this case is too trivial to use one. –  Spudley May 6 '12 at 18:32

Would setting the i variable to the somecondition value be a good way?

for (var i=0; i<SomeCondition; i++) {

   if (data[i]===true) {
   //do stuff
   i=SomeCondition;
   }
}
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