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I used to dispatch a key event in FireFox 10 and 11. Recently I update my browser to FireFox 12 and dispatching stop working.

Here is a sample code of what I've been done.

When you run it in Firefox 11 or less, you can find a character printed in the textbox.

Why it doesn't work in FF12, and how can I fix it? Any alternative solution is also appropriated.

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What's wrong? The event is fired: jsfiddle.net/EshwS/5 – Rob W May 6 '12 at 15:00
    
it doesn't work in FF 12. There are several machines here, I check it on all of them. It's working on FF 11, 10, 9,... – Reza Owliaei May 6 '12 at 15:01
    
Define "Does not work". In my demo, in FF 12.0, an alert shows up: i.stack.imgur.com/rxxwd.png – Rob W May 6 '12 at 15:01
    
In older versions, this code prints the 1740 character in the input, while the input remains empty in new version of FF. – Reza Owliaei May 6 '12 at 15:04
    
For which purpose you wanna do that? unit testing? why not just referencing the input node and applying a value to fill it? – Tobias Krogh May 6 '12 at 15:18

Why don't you just assign the value (character #1740) to the inputbox on page load? Like:

$('#name').val(String.fromCharCode(1740))​; 

See this jsfiddle

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check my fiddle with an empty input observing the keypress event and then replacing the input when entering an "A"... try it out

EDIT: this might work different in other browsers but is working for me in modern browsers like Firefox and Chrome / Chromium... holder IEs might behave different when observing an event

EDIT 2: updated fiddle rev 1 to also hold a global mapping like you suggested... a small sidenote: some browsers might not support to retrieve the entered key code from event.keyCode so check event.which as well (jQuery would combine them into event.which and would also enable you to easily observe the keypress cross-browser).

fiddle

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Korgh: Here is your bug: 1. Press 'A' 2. Select input text 3. Press 'A' again Input text should be replaced with newly pressed key char (1740), however you will see two 1740 characters in the input. – Reza Owliaei May 8 '12 at 9:29
    
first of all it is Krogh not Korgh... second: bug? it is not like you asked directly for it or gave a code sample that did what you wanted... I only wanted to help you and give you an impression of how you could start... looking at my description the code of my fiddle is absolutely correct... I never stated to build a fully working solution for you, did I? (negative vote means this is a wrong / bad answer but it is not) – Tobias Krogh May 8 '12 at 10:16
    
I even voted up for your question so it gains a 0 rather than a -1 to get more attention for it so we get a good answer... but blaming me for "bugs" (which aren't any at all regarding the fiddle) is mean – Tobias Krogh May 8 '12 at 10:18
1  
I never vote you down dude! I mentioned a bug of your kind suggestion, I mean, there is a problem with that solution. I tried to apply your solution and replace my method. Thank you so much for your helps and attentions Tobias and pardon me for my bad grammar. – Reza Owliaei May 8 '12 at 10:53
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is their answer in BugZilla. Dispatching key event seem's to be rejected anymore for security reasons:

Please note that initKeyEvent() still works. Editors just refuse the key events for both security and unclear in current spec.

But I still can't realize why my dispatched event is untrusted.

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