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I'm trying to learn how to make a top-level Win32 window become a child of another window.

When I change a window's parent, I still get ugly rounded corners, as though it was a top-level window with a rounded title bar. Why? And how do I fix this? (I couldn't get WM_UPDATEUISTATE to help, but I'm not sure how to use it correctly either.)

Screenshot

#include <tchar.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <commctrl.h>
int _tmain()
{
    WNDCLASS wndClass = {
        0, &DefWindowProc, 0, 0, NULL, NULL, LoadCursor(NULL, IDC_ARROW),
        GetSysColorBrush(COLOR_3DFACE), NULL, TEXT("MyWindowClass")
    };
    ATOM atom = RegisterClass(&wndClass);
    HWND hWnd = CreateWindow(MAKEINTATOM(atom), TEXT("Win"),
        WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW | WS_VISIBLE, CW_USEDEFAULT, CW_USEDEFAULT,
        CW_USEDEFAULT, CW_USEDEFAULT, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    HWND hWndChild = CreateWindowEx(WS_EX_CLIENTEDGE,
        WC_EDIT, TEXT("Control"), WS_OVERLAPPEDWINDOW | WS_VISIBLE,
        10, 10, 86, 24, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    SetParent(hWndChild, hWnd);                     // Change the parent
    SetWindowLong(hWndChild, GWL_STYLE,             // Set child styles
        GetWindowLong(hWndChild, GWL_STYLE)
            & ~(WS_OVERLAPPED | WS_POPUP | WS_CAPTION | WS_SYSMENU |
                WS_THICKFRAME | WS_MINIMIZEBOX | WS_MAXIMIZEBOX)
            | WS_CHILDWINDOW);
    SetWindowPos(hWndChild, NULL, 0, 0, 0, 0,       // Refresh
        SWP_NOMOVE | SWP_NOZORDER | SWP_NOACTIVATE
            | SWP_NOOWNERZORDER | SWP_NOSIZE | SWP_FRAMECHANGED);
    BOOL bRet;
    MSG msg;
    while ((bRet = GetMessage(&msg, hWnd, 0, 0)) != 0 && bRet != -1)
    {
        TranslateMessage(&msg);
        DispatchMessage(&msg);
    }
}
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A child window should be WS_CHILD and not WS_POP. –  Hans Passant May 6 '12 at 17:06
    
@HansPassant: Right, that's why I used SetWindowLong to change the styles after creation. Or did I miss something? –  Mehrdad May 6 '12 at 17:09
    
This is highly irregular. Better would be to create the window as a child from the beginning -- initially put it inside a top-level window parent. Then you can move it to a new parent without having to fiddle with all the styles. –  Raymond Chen May 6 '12 at 17:13
    
@RaymondChen: Right, but the question is, how do you do this when the window isn't a child at the beginning? I don't really mind if the code is complicated, as long as it works. (Is it even possible? I thought the existence of SetParent implies that it is...) –  Mehrdad May 6 '12 at 17:17
    
@RaymondChen: Or, let me pose a different question, if you will: Which properties of a window should not be modified after the window is created? (In other words, which parameters to CreateWindowEx can I put off until later, and which parameters must I supply right there for correct operation?) From your response, I'm assuming hwndParent is one of them, and (obviously) the class name is one of them -- but are there any others? –  Mehrdad May 6 '12 at 17:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like this is possible in principle but difficult to get 'right' practically (according to Raymond's comment).

I found that SetWindowRgn(hWnd, NULL, TRUE); does the trick, but I don't think it's correct -- there might be other things I've missed. So the correct solution is probably to just construct the object correctly at the beginning.

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