Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Quite often on SO I find myself benchmarking small chunks of code to see which implemnetation is fastest.

Quite often I see comments that benchmarking code does not take into account jitting or the garbage collector.

I have the following simple benchmarking function which I have slowly evolved:

  static void Profile(string description, int iterations, Action func) {
        // warm up 
        func();
        // clean up
        GC.Collect();

        var watch = new Stopwatch();
        watch.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
            func();
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.Write(description);
        Console.WriteLine(" Time Elapsed {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }

Usage:

Profile("a descriptions", how_many_iterations_to_run, () =>
{
   // ... code being profiled
});

Does this implementation have any flaws? Is it good enough to show that implementaion X is faster than implementation Y over Z iterations? Can you think of any ways you would improve this?

EDIT Its pretty clear that a time based approach (as opposed to iterations), is preferred, does anyone have any implementations where the time checks do not impact performance?

share|improve this question
    
thats cool if it doesnt –  Luke Lowrey Jun 26 '09 at 4:13

11 Answers 11

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Here is the modified function: as recommended by the community, feel free to amend this its a community wiki.

static void Profile(string description, int iterations, Action func) {

    // clean up
    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    GC.Collect();

    // warm up 
    func();

    var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
        func();
    }
    watch.Stop();
    Console.Write(description);
    Console.WriteLine(" Time Elapsed {0} ms", watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You might want to unroll the loop by some number of times, like 10, to minimize the loop overhead. –  Mike Dunlavey Jun 26 '09 at 12:49
2  
I just updated to use Stopwatch.StartNew. Not a functional change, but saves one line of code. –  LukeH Jun 26 '09 at 13:23
    
@Luke, great change (I wish I could +1 it). @Mike im not sure, i suspect the virtualcall overhead will be much higher that the comparison and assignment, so the performance diff will be negligible –  Sam Saffron Jun 27 '09 at 0:05
    
I'd propose you to pass iteration count to the Action, and create the loop there (possibly - even unrolled). In case you're measuring relatively short operation this is the only option. And I'd prefer seeing inverse metric - e.g. count of passes/sec. –  Alex Yakunin Jun 28 '09 at 12:37
2  
What do you think about showing the average time. Something like this: Console.WriteLine(" Average Time Elapsed {0} ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds / iterations); –  rudimenter Jun 28 '12 at 13:07

Finalisation won't necessarily be completed before GC.Collect returns. The finalisation is queued and then run on a separate thread. This thread could still be active during your tests, affecting the results.

If you want to ensure that finalisation has completed before starting your tests then you might want to call GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers, which will block until the finalisation queue is cleared:

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
GC.Collect();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 good point ! –  Sam Saffron Jun 26 '09 at 11:25
5  
Why GC.Collect() once more? –  colinfang May 6 '13 at 19:31
3  
@colinfang Because objects being "finalized" are not GC'ed by the finalizer. So the second Collect is there to make sure the "finalized" objects are also collected. –  MAV Jul 28 at 23:50

If you want to take GC interactions out of the equation, you may want to run your 'warm up' call after the GC.Collect call, not before. That way you know .NET will already have enough memory allocated from the OS for the working set of your function.

Keep in mind that you're making a non-inlined method call for each iteration, so make sure you compare the things you're testing to an empty body. You'll also have to accept that you can only reliably time things that are several times longer than a method call.

Also, depending on what kind of stuff you're profiling, you may want to do your timing based running for a certain amount of time rather than for a certain number of iterations -- it can tend to lead to more easily-comparable numbers without having to have a very short run for the best implementation and/or a very long one for the worst.

share|improve this answer
    
good points, would you have a time based implementation in mind? –  Sam Saffron Jun 26 '09 at 5:51

I'd avoid passing the delegate at all:

  1. Delegate call is ~ virtual method call. Not cheap: ~ 25% of smallest memory allocation in .NET. If you're interested in details, see e.g. this link.
  2. Anonymous delegates may lead to usage of closures, that you won't even notice. Again, accessing closure fields is noticeably than e.g. accessing a variable on the stack.

An example code leading to closure usage:

public void Test()
{
  int someNumber = 1;
  Profiler.Profile("Closure access", 1000000, 
    () => someNumber + someNumber);
}

If you're not aware about closures, take a look at this method in .NET Reflector.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting points, but how would you create a re-usable Profile() method if you don't pass a delegate? Are there other ways to pass arbitrary code to a method? –  Ash Nov 7 '09 at 7:54
    
We use "using (new Measurement(...)) { ... measured code ... }". So we get Measurement object implementing IDisposable instead of passing the delegate. See code.google.com/p/dataobjectsdotnet/source/browse/Xtensive.Core/… –  Alex Yakunin Nov 9 '09 at 12:30
    
This won't lead to any issues with closures. –  Alex Yakunin Nov 9 '09 at 12:30
2  
@AlexYakunin: your link appears to be broken. Could you include the code for the Measurement class in your answer? I suspect that no matter how you implement it, you'll not be able to run the code to be profiled multiple times with this IDisposable approach. However, it is indeed very useful in situations where you want to measure how different parts of a complex (intertwined) application are performing, so long as you keep in mind that the measurements might be inaccurate, and inconsistent when ran at different times. I'm using the same approach in most of my projects. –  ShdNx Jun 30 '12 at 17:37
    
The requirement to run performance test several times is really important (warm-up + multiple measurements), so I switched to an approach with delegate as well. Moreover, if you don't use closures, delegate invocation is faster then interface method call in case with IDisposable. –  Alex Yakunin Aug 13 '12 at 0:38

I'd call func() several times for the warm-up, not just one.

share|improve this answer
    
The intention was to ensure jit compilation is performed, what advantage do you get from calling func multiple times prior to measurement? –  Sam Saffron Jul 22 '09 at 5:17
3  
To give the JIT a chance to improve its first results. –  Alexey Romanov Jul 22 '09 at 5:55

I think the most difficult problem to overcome with benchmarking methods like this is accounting for edge cases and the unexpected. For example - "How do the two code snippets work under high CPU load/network usage/disk thrashing/etc." They're great for basic logic checks to see if a particular algorithm works significantly faster than another. But to properly test most code performance you'd have to create a test that measures the specific bottlenecks of that particular code.

I'd still say that testing small blocks of code often has little return on investment and can encourage using overly complex code instead of simple maintainable code. Writing clear code that other developers, or myself 6 months down the line, can understand quickly will have more performance benefits than highly optimized code.

share|improve this answer
1  
significant is one of those terms that is really loaded. sometimes having an implementation that is 20% faster is significant, sometimes it has to be 100 times faster to be significant. Agree with you on clarity see: stackoverflow.com/questions/1018407/… –  Sam Saffron Jun 26 '09 at 5:54
    
In this case significant isn't all that loaded. You're comparing one or more concurrent implementations and if the difference in performance of those two implementations isn't statistically significant it's not worth committing to the more complex method. –  Paul Alexander Jun 28 '12 at 4:02

Skeet's got a small benchmarking framework that is pretty good. Might not hurt to check that out.

share|improve this answer
    
Just checked it out: it suffers from all the issues listed above. –  Alex Yakunin Jun 26 '09 at 4:27

Depending on the code you are benchmarking and the platform it runs on, you may need to account for how code alignment affects performance. To do so would probably require a outer wrapper that ran the test multiple times (in separate app domains or processes?), some of the times first calling "padding code" to force it to be JIT compiled, so as to cause the code being benchmarked to be aligned differently. A complete test result would give the best-case and worst-case timings for the various code alignments.

share|improve this answer

Suggestions for improvement

  1. Detecting if the execution environment is good for benchmarking (such as detecting if a debugger is attached or if jit optimization is disabled which would result in incorrect measurements).

  2. Measuring parts of the code independently (to see exactly where the bottleneck is).

  3. Comparing different versions/components/chunks of code (In your first sentence you say '... benchmarking small chunks of code to see which implementation is fastest.').

Regarding #1:

  • To detect if a debugger is attached, read the property System.Diagnostics.Debugger.IsAttached (Remember to also handle the case where the debugger is initially not attached, but is attached after some time).

  • To detect if jit optimization is disabled, read property DebuggableAttribute.IsJITOptimizerDisabled of the relevant assemblies:

    private bool IsJitOptimizerDisabled(Assembly assembly)
    {
        return assembly.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (DebuggableAttribute), false)
            .Select(customAttribute => (DebuggableAttribute) customAttribute)
            .Any(attribute => attribute.IsJITOptimizerDisabled);
    }
    

Regarding #2:

This can be done in many ways. One way is to allow several delegates to be supplied and then measure those delegates individually.

Regarding #3:

This could also be done in many ways, and different use-cases would demand very different solutions. If the benchmark is invoked manually, then writing to the console might be fine. However if the benchmark is performed automatically by the build system, then writing to the console is probably not so fine.

One way to do this is to return the benchmark result as a strongly typed object that can easily be consumed in different contexts.


Etimo.Benchmarks

Another approach is to use an existing component to perform the benchmarks. Actually, at my company we decided to release our benchmark tool to public domain. At it's core, it manages the garbage collector, jitter, warmups etc, just like some of the other answers here suggest. It also has the three features I suggested above. It manages several of the issues discussed in Eric Lippert blog.

This is an example output where two components are compared and the results are written to the console. In this case the two components compared are called 'KeyedCollection' and 'MultiplyIndexedKeyedCollection':

Etimo.Benchmarks - Sample Console Output

There is a NuGet package, a sample NuGet package and the source code is available at GitHub. There is also a blog post.

If you're in a hurry, I suggest you get the sample package and simply modify the sample delegates as needed. If you're not in a hurry, it might be a good idea to read the blog post to understand the details.

share|improve this answer

You must also run a "warm up" pass prior to actual measurement to exclude the time JIT compiler spends on jitting your code.

share|improve this answer
    
it is performed prior to measurement –  Sam Saffron Jun 26 '09 at 5:54

If you're trying to eliminate Garbage Collection impact from the benchmark complete, is it worth setting GCSettings.LatencyMode?

If not, and you want the impact of garbage created in func to be part of the benchmark, then shouldn't you also force collection at the end of the test (inside the timer)?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.