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I have

x = [false, false, true, true, false]

I want a function that returns true if there's at least one true in the array, like this: http://jsfiddle.net/7uVWk/

x = [false, false, true, true, false];

function hasTrue(x) {
  result = false;
  ​for (var i=0; i <​x.length; i++) {
    result = result || x[i];
  }
}  
document.write(hasTrue(result));

How can I achieve this result more succinctly?

share|improve this question
    
@TimPietzcker I like Python too! Just right now I'm wrestling with node.js. It's quite a change of pace. –  Tina CG Hoehr May 6 '12 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using Array.prototype.some (I did not write a separate function, because this syntax does already make much sense):

var x = [false, false, true, true, false];
x.some(function(val) {
    return val === true;
}); // true or false. In this case, true
share|improve this answer
    
I've never seen that method used before, any idea how well supported it is cross browser? –  James Gaunt May 6 '12 at 17:17
    
Brilliant! You're the man! –  Tina CG Hoehr May 6 '12 at 17:19
    
@JamesGaunt See the linked documentation. It also includes a polyfill. –  Rob W May 6 '12 at 17:19
2  
+1 This shows explicitly the use of .some(), but in practice you could just do return val;, or better, or shorter anyway, x.some(Boolean). –  cliffs of insanity May 6 '12 at 17:22
    
@RobW Since the .some implementation is beyond my comprehension, I wonder how the .some approach performs compared to leaving a for loop when a true is found. Wait, I think they're the same. –  Tina CG Hoehr May 6 '12 at 17:22

Well, you could quit the loop when you find your first true:

x = [false, false, true, true, false];

function hasTrue(x) {
  ​for (var i=0; i <​x.length; i++) {
    if(x[i]) return true;
  }
  return false;
}  
document.write(hasTrue(result));

Is that succinct enough?

share|improve this answer
    
It's a great idea! –  Tina CG Hoehr May 6 '12 at 17:13

Logically or'ing all elements in an array is equivalent to just one of them being true. The following function would be much more efficient:

function arrayHasTrue(x_)
{
    for(var i = 0; i < x_.length; ++i)
    {
        if(x_[ i ])
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This might skip the first value since you're doing ++i –  MilkyWayJoe May 6 '12 at 17:14
2  
Not true, the third expression of a for loop isn't evaluated until after the first iteration. –  inspector-g May 6 '12 at 17:15
    
I wasn't sure, that's why I said might, and yeah, this doesn't skip anything –  MilkyWayJoe May 6 '12 at 17:22
2  
One should be careful in using "mights" and "maybes" in the context of well-defined programming languages; it implies undefined behavior and often leads to unnecessary checks that can, in the right circumstances, affect the performance of a system. In the case of for loops, the behavior of the third expression is well-defined. It should also be noted that the prefix increment/decrement operators are sometimes faster than postfix increment/decrement operators (but never slower). –  inspector-g May 6 '12 at 17:29
    
anyway... plus 1 :) –  MilkyWayJoe May 7 '12 at 3:44

You could use recursion:

function hasTrue(x) {
  return x.length == 1 ? x[0] : x[0] || hasTrue(x.slice(1));
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Unconventional, but it works, so you have my upvote :) –  Tina CG Hoehr May 6 '12 at 18:02
    
That's going to waste a lot of time copying x if it is long. –  Kevin Reid May 6 '12 at 19:17
    
@KevinReid: Yes, of course, but the OP didn't ask for a fast solution. Did you downvote the answer because it doesn't meet some criteria that you invented yourself? –  Guffa May 6 '12 at 20:48
    
Sure. I think it's unwise to present such code without noting its disadvantages in case someone decides to use it outside of the original context. Also, the OP didn't say "Nothing but succinctness matters." –  Kevin Reid May 6 '12 at 20:50
    
@KevinReid: Sigh. Even the OP approved of the code... –  Guffa May 6 '12 at 21:00

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