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I would like to know: how can I iterate through a 2D map? I have a centralMap:

private final Map<String, Map<String, String>> centralMap = 
    new HashMap<String, Map<String, String>>();

which contains another map:

Map<String,String> nestedMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

as Value, and the second one is created in the "put" method, so that in the constructor, i have just the centralMap. Now i want to redefine this method and to get complete entry of the map (the 2 keys and the value for each element)

public Iterator<Entry> iterator()

How should I proceed? If possible, how can I remove an element through the iterator without having a problem?

share|improve this question
    
Do you want an Iterator that goes through all the entries in all the nested maps? Is that it? – Marko Topolnik May 6 '12 at 17:51
    
yes, all right! – ZelelB May 8 '12 at 10:25

Iterators are meant to operate on a collection, such as the keyset of your first map, or the values (which are a collection of maps) of your nested one. You cannot expect the iterator renove method to understand your complex structure.

I would suggest that you build your own class for this, with your own convenience methods that do what you described.

Also, going on a limb here: make sure you didn't just want to have a multimap. If so, have a look, for example, at guava's HashMultimap

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, this looks more like a Guava Table than a Multimap. – Louis Wasserman May 6 '12 at 20:29

If you want to get Map.Entry elements containing the two keys and the value, it will really be much more natural to create a class Pair<String, String> that combines the two keys in a single element and use that as the key in a single map rather than nesting maps.

If you do this, your main structure will be a Map<Pair<String, String>, String> and using the Map.entrySet() method will give you a Set<Map.Entry<String, String>, String> from which you can get an iterator that gives approximately what you're after.

If you need to have a Map<String, Map<String, String>> for other reasons, it is also possible to convert this into the structure described above by reasonably simple code, and this might be the most sensible way of getting the information out of it.

Edit Note:

The Pair class described above is essentially the same as Map.Entry, so you could avoid creating a new class for the key by building a Map<Map.Entry<String, String>, String>. I think it makes the code a bit less clear, but it can certainly be made functionally equivalent.

Sample Code

In the code below, I have defined the Pair class as an inner static (for real use, you might want to extract as an independent class), and written a conversion that takes a nested map as you describe, converts it to the form I've suggested, and uses an iterator on the entries of the converted map to print the values.

The iterator could of course be used for other things, and the convert method and Pair class are generic.

import java.util.*;

public class TestMap
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Map<String, String> innerMap1 = new HashMap<String, String>();
        Map<String, String> innerMap2 = new HashMap<String, String>();
        Map<String, Map<String, String>> outerMap = new HashMap<String, Map<String, String>>();

        innerMap1.put("InnerKey1", "Val1");
        innerMap1.put("InnerKey2", "Val2");
        innerMap1.put("InnerKey3", "Val3");
        innerMap1.put("InnerKey4", "Val4");

        innerMap2.put("InnerKey5", "Val5");
        innerMap2.put("InnerKey6", "Val6");
        innerMap2.put("InnerKey7", "Val7");
        innerMap2.put("InnerKey8", "Val8");

        outerMap.put("OuterKey1", innerMap1);
        outerMap.put("OuterKey2", innerMap2);

        Map<Pair<String, String>, String> convertedMap = convert(outerMap);
        for (Map.Entry<Pair<String, String>, String> entry: convertedMap.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println(String.format("OuterKey: %s, InnerKey: %s, Value: %s",
                    entry.getKey().getFirst(),
                    entry.getKey().getSecond(),
                    entry.getValue()
            ));
        }
    }

    private static <K1,K2,V> Map<Pair<K1, K2>,V> convert(Map<K1, Map<K2,V>> nestedMap) {
        Map<Pair<K1, K2>, V> result = new HashMap<Pair<K1, K2>, V>();
        for (Map.Entry<K1, Map<K2, V>> outerEntry: nestedMap.entrySet()) {
            final K1 outerKey = outerEntry.getKey();
            for (Map.Entry<K2, V> innerEntry: outerEntry.getValue().entrySet()) {
                final K2 innerKey = innerEntry.getKey();
                final V value = innerEntry.getValue();
                result.put(new Pair<K1, K2>(outerKey, innerKey), value);
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    public static class Pair<T1, T2> {

        private T1 first;
        private T2 second;

        public Pair(T1 first, T2 second) {
            this.first = first;
            this.second = second;
        }

        public T1 getFirst() {
            return first;
        }

        public T2 getSecond() {
            return second;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object o) {
            if (this == o) return true;
            if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) return false;

            Pair pair = (Pair) o;

            if (first != null ? !first.equals(pair.first) : pair.first != null) return false;
            if (second != null ? !second.equals(pair.second) : pair.second != null) return false;

            return true;
        }

        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            int result = first != null ? first.hashCode() : 0;
            result = 31 * result + (second != null ? second.hashCode() : 0);
            return result;
        }

    }
}

Note on Usage in context:

In your current code, you have a class with a field centralMap which is the map in your old nested form, and an integer counter for the size of the map.

This containing class has a method for adding entries that looks like this:

@Override
public String put(final String row, final String column, final String value) {
    /**
     * Second map which is contained by centralMap, that contain Strings as Keys
     * and Values.
     */
    Map<String, String> nestedMap;

    if (centralMap.containsKey(row))
        nestedMap = centralMap.get(row);
    else
        nestedMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
    if (!nestedMap.containsKey(column))
        counter++;
    centralMap.put(row, nestedMap);
    return nestedMap.put(column, value);
}

If instead of using the nested map at all, you change this field to a map of the suggested form, this method would become a bit simpler:

@Override
public String put(final String row, final String column, final String value) {
    Pair<String, String> key = new Pair(row, column);
    if (centralMap.contains(key)
        counter++;
    centralMap.put(key, value);
}

And you actually wouldn't need the counter anymore, as it will always contain the same value as centralMap.size().

Update:

From edits put in yesterday but now deleted, it's now clear to me (from edit history) that you want to build a single iterator that delegates to all the iterators of the map in correct sequence, and returns a simple structure containing both keys and the value.

This is certainly possible, and if I have time later, I might add some sample code for it. As was noted in another response, the iterator.remove() method may be impossible or unnatural.

Meanwhile, your requirements (as noted a comment on the same other response) is rather similar to what is supplied by guava's Table. That's open source, and looking at it may give you ideas. You can download the source for guava here.

Specifically, in guava's StandardTable, there is an inner class CellIterator, which looks like:

  private class CellIterator implements Iterator<Cell<R, C, V>> {
    final Iterator<Entry<R, Map<C, V>>> rowIterator
        = backingMap.entrySet().iterator();
    Entry<R, Map<C, V>> rowEntry;
    Iterator<Entry<C, V>> columnIterator
        = Iterators.emptyModifiableIterator();

    @Override public boolean hasNext() {
      return rowIterator.hasNext() || columnIterator.hasNext();
    }

    @Override public Cell<R, C, V> next() {
      if (!columnIterator.hasNext()) {
        rowEntry = rowIterator.next();
        columnIterator = rowEntry.getValue().entrySet().iterator();
      }
      Entry<C, V> columnEntry = columnIterator.next();
      return Tables.immutableCell(
          rowEntry.getKey(), columnEntry.getKey(), columnEntry.getValue());
    }

    @Override public void remove() {
      columnIterator.remove();
      if (rowEntry.getValue().isEmpty()) {
        rowIterator.remove();
      }
    }
  }

You can't just copy this code as it depends on other things in guava, but it shows the basic pattern of what you have to do.

share|improve this answer
    
but i don't want to print anything.. I just want to get an iterator for the whole map, that i can use later as iterator for a StringMap2D class, that would be just used as in a normal map when you call the iterator, like stringmap.iterator(); because my map is a 2Dimensional map, i mean there s a nested map as value for the 1st map.. thanks for your help! – ZelelB May 6 '12 at 19:03
    
Did I mention printing? I have now, but it's only used in the code as demo of using the iterator. – Don Roby May 6 '12 at 19:13
    
I edited the Question Roby.. please take a look at it. Thanks! – ZelelB May 6 '12 at 19:57
    
I edited the answer as well. Have a look! – Don Roby May 6 '12 at 20:53
    
cant use that put method, because it is a homework, and we are not allowed to make that. We have to put a map in another one. :S just the iterator method is missing now :s Addedd my String2D.Entry, that is already given.. we have just to implement this TrueStringMap2D class – ZelelB May 7 '12 at 14:58

You apply the same procedure as if you were iterating over a single map, you just do it twice:

public void printNestedMap(Map<String, Map<String, String>> map)
  Iterator it = map.entrySet().iterator();
    while (it.hasNext()) {
        Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next(); // <- pairs.getValue() is a map
        System.out.println("Key1: " + pairs.getKey());
        //print the inner Map
        printMap((Map<String, String>)pairs.getValue());
        it.remove(); // avoids a ConcurrentModificationException
    }
}

EDIT

It would actually be better to move the iteration over a single map to a different method to be called in this scenario.

public void printMap(Map<String, String>> map)
{
   Iterator it = map.entrySet().iterator();
   while(it.hasNext())
   {
      Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next(); // <- pairs.getValue() is a String
      System.out.println("Key2: " + pairs.getKey() + " Value2: " + pairs.getValue());
      it.remove();
   }
}

EDIT 2: Test Program

   import java.util.*;
   public class TestMap
   {
      public static void main(String[] args)
      {
         Map<String, String> innerMap              = new HashMap<>();
         Map<String, Map<String, String>> outerMap = new HashMap<>();

         innerMap.put("Key1", "Val1");
         innerMap.put("Key2", "Val2");
         innerMap.put("Key3", "Val3");
         innerMap.put("Key4", "Val4");

         outerMap.put("OuterKey1", innerMap);
         printNestedMap(outerMap);
      }

      public static void printNestedMap(Map<String, Map<String, String>> map)
      {
         Iterator it = map.entrySet().iterator();
         while (it.hasNext()) {
            Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next(); // <- pairs.getValue() is a map
            System.out.println("Key1: " + pairs.getKey());
            //print the inner Map
            printMap((Map<String, String>)pairs.getValue());
            it.remove(); // avoids a ConcurrentModificationException
         }
      }

      public static void printMap(Map<String, String> map)
      {
         Iterator it = map.entrySet().iterator();
         while(it.hasNext())
         {
            Map.Entry pairs = (Map.Entry)it.next(); // <- pairs.getValue() is a String
            System.out.println("Key2: " + pairs.getKey() + " Value2: " + pairs.getValue());
            it.remove();
         }
      }
   }

Output:

Key1: OuterKey1
Key2: Key2 Value2: Val2
Key2: Key1 Value2: Val1
Key2: Key4 Value2: Val4
Key2: Key3 Value2: Val3
share|improve this answer
    
in this line Iterator it2 = pairs.getValue().entrySet().iterator(); there is a compiling problem.. entrySet() was underlined "Add cast to pairs.getValue()".. and when i do it i get an exception by the execution :S – ZelelB May 6 '12 at 17:48
    
Oh sorry you probably need to cast to a Map. – Hunter McMillen May 6 '12 at 17:49
    
i did it but there was an exception.. – ZelelB May 6 '12 at 17:49
    
public class testclass { public static void main(String... args) { StringMap2D testmap = new TrueStringMap2D(); testmap.put("Todd", "Physics", "3.7"); testmap.put("Mike", "Chemie", "2.0"); testmap.put("Minnie", "Math","1.0"); testmap.iterator(); } } and here is the error: Key1: Minnie Exception in thread "main" Key2: Todd Value2: {Physics=3.7} java.lang.IllegalStateException at java.util.HashMap$HashIterator.remove(Unknown Source) at stringmap2d.TrueStringMap2D.iterator(TrueStringMap2D.java:205) at stringmap2d.testclass.main(testclass.java:14) – ZelelB May 6 '12 at 17:53
    
@ZelelB I am not having any problems with the code. Ill post my test program. – Hunter McMillen May 6 '12 at 17:58

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