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I am having this error:

The output shows 3 C's which are from the program. I typed in "12.34" myself.

The anticipated output was supposed to be:

C
C
C
12.34
12.34 is the first string
12.34 is the second string

12.34 was supposed to be converted to double but I got weird characters instead.

enter image description here

I was not able to find the solution. I tried different methods but I still got the same error.

Here is my program:

    int ch = 0;
    int i = 0;
    int counter = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    double[] conArray = new double[3];
    //string[] conArray = new string[3];
    double dataDbl;
    String dataStr = null;
    double data = 0;
    String s = "C";
    String t = "Hello";
    //StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
    //String con = "C";
    ////System.out.println("Starting!");
    System.out.println("C");
    buffer.setLength(0);
    System.out.println("C");
    buffer.setLength(0);
    System.out.println("C");

    buffer.delete(0,buffer.length());


    while (i < 300) {
        ch = inStream.read();
        if ((ch == '\r') || (ch == '\n')) {
            i = 300;
        }
        buffer.append((char)ch);
        i++;
    }
    dataStr = buffer.toString();
    dataDbl = Double.parseDouble(dataStr.trim());

    conArray[counter] = dataDbl;

    outStream.writeChars(dataStr);
    System.out.println(" is the first string"); 

    outStream.writeDouble(conArray[counter]);
    System.out.println(" is the first data");  

    buffer.delete(0,buffer.length());
    counter++;

I found the fix, here it is:

                int trash = 0;
                trash = inStream.read();
                System.out.println("C");
                while (true) {
                    ch2 = inStream.read();
                    if ((ch2 == '\r') || (ch2 == '\n')) {
                        break;
                    }

                    if (ch2 != 32) {
                       sb.append((char)ch2);
                    }

I put an integer called trash to get rid of the spaces or unwanted characters before inStream. Worked perfectly. The problem was the serial device terminates its output with and . These two stays in the buffer unread so when the next data is read, nothing really is there and thus error occurs at Double.parseDouble(dataStr.trim());.

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closed as not a real question by casperOne May 7 '12 at 11:31

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Any idea why the error occurred? –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:05
    
Agree with @juergend, besides, this code doesn't compile, where are you defining buffer? –  Eugenio Cuevas May 6 '12 at 18:09
    
How to accept? I know this sounds so dumb... –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:11
    
Just click on the big, green check mark you have in the left of the best answer, but you should read the FAQ first... –  Eugenio Cuevas May 6 '12 at 18:13
    
Okay, i'll review all my threads. –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:15

2 Answers 2

Print the String you are trying to parse as double to the console, just before parsing it:

System.out.println(dataStr.trim());

It should show a parseable double (in your case 12.34) otherwise you are doing something wrong getting it from the stream

share|improve this answer
    
I tried it and it appeared as it should be (12.34). –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:38
    
...but does not appear through outStream –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:42
    
What kind of object is outStream? And where are you expecting it to appear, console? –  Eugenio Cuevas May 6 '12 at 18:45
    
I don't think that the problem is with outStream. I'll get back to you when I fix it. :) –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:54

The simplest way to exit a loop is to use break; In your case you are making sure the loop will exit but you will still be adding \r or \n to the buffer which is not part of a number.

Stepping through a debugger is the quickest way to find out what the code is doing, esp when its not doing what you expect. In an IDE it is usually the button next to Run.

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Can I run a debugger with a modem? I'm uploading the program into it. –  Jpeh Noynay May 6 '12 at 18:20
1  
I would get the program working locally first, emulating any devices/services which you don't have. –  Peter Lawrey May 6 '12 at 19:23

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