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Question: 2520 is the smallest number that can be divided by each of the numbers from 1 to 10 without any remainder.

What is the smallest positive number that is evenly divisible by all of the numbers from 1 to 20?

So, I was trying to do exercise 5 on project euler and I came out with this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define TRUE 1
#define FALSE 0

int main () {
   int n, fnd = FALSE, count, i; 

   for (i = 1; fnd == FALSE; i++) {       
      count = 0;
      for (n = 1; n <= 20; n++) {
         count += i % n;
      }
      printf ("testing %d, count was: %d\n", i, count);
      if (count == 0) {
         fnd = TRUE;
         printf ("%d\n", i); 
      }
   }
   return 0;
}

I believe my apporach is correct, it will surely find the number which is divisible by 1 to 20. But it's been computing for 5 minutes, and still no result. Is my approach correct? If yes, then is there another way to do it? I can't think on another way to solve this, tips would be very much appreciated. Thank you in advance.

EDIT: So, based on the advice I was given by you guys I figured it out, thank you so much! So, it's still brute force, but instead of adding 1 to the last number, it now adds 2520, which is the LCM of 1 to 10. And therefore, calculating if the sum of the remainders of the multiples of 2520 divided from 11 to 20 was 0. Since 2520 is already divisible by 1 to 10, I only needed to divide by 11 to 20.

#include <stdio.h>
#define TRUE 1
#define FALSE 0

int main () {
   int n, fnd = FALSE, count, i; 

   for (i = 2520; fnd == FALSE; i = i + 2520) {       
      count = 0;
      for (n = 11; n <= 20; n++) {
         count += i % n;
      }
      printf ("testing %d, count was: %d\n", i, count);
      if (count == 0 && i != 0) {
         fnd = TRUE;
         printf ("%d\n", i); 
      }
   }
   return 0;
}

Thank you so much, I wouldn't solve it without your help : ) PS: It now computes in less than 10 secs.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, just edited the question. –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 18:36
    
Thank you, now it's much better –  Vlad May 6 '12 at 18:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your approach is taking too long because it is a brute-force solution. You need to be slightly clever.

My hint for you is this: What does it mean for a number to be evenly divisible by another number? Or every number below a certain number? Are there commonalities in the prime factors of the numbers? The Wikipedia page on divisibility should be a good starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
Well... It's kinda embarassing but I don't have a good background on math... If you could simplify the basics... –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 18:44
1  
Don't be embarrassed, many excellent programmers struggle with the purer branches of math. The basic gist you need to grok for this problem is that for a number to be divisible by every number from 1-20, it really only needs to be divisible by the primes between 1 and 20, i.e. 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19. This is because every number between 1 and 20 can be written as a product of some primes less than or equal to itself. So take 10, you can write it as 2*5. 15, 3*5. 16, 2*2*2*2. –  pg1989 May 6 '12 at 19:05
1  
Spilling into another comment: So the number you're looking for will look like this: (2^a)*(3^b)*(5^c)*(7^d)*(11^e)*(13^f)*(17^g)*(19^h). Don't be intimidated by the notation here, it simply means that you need to search over the exponents rather than every number. –  pg1989 May 6 '12 at 19:08
    
I made it based on your and others advice! Thank you! (I edited the question and explained how I finally made it) –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 19:17

Hint: You should look up "least common multiple".


Next hint:

  1. The answer is the least common multiple (LCM) of the numbers 1, 2, 3, ..., 20.
  2. LCM of n numbers can be found sequentially: if LCM(1, 2) = x, than LCM(1, 2, 3) = LCM(x, 3); if LCM(1, 2, 3) = y, than LCM(1, 2, 3, 4) = LCM(y, 4) etc. So it's enough to know how to find LCM of any 2 numbers.
  3. For finding LCM of 2 numbers we can use the following formula: LCM(p, q) = pq/GCD(p, q), where GCD is the greatest common divisor
  4. For finding GCD, there is a well-known Euclid's algorithm (perhaps the first non-trivial algorithm on the Earth).
share|improve this answer
    
But it will be zero again in the next loop, and if the sum of the remainder of each number divided by 1 to 20 equals 0, it will still be zero, thereafter closing the cycle. –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 18:38
1  
@Lucas: you're right, changed my answer. –  Vlad May 6 '12 at 18:42
    
I've done some research, and still can't figure the answer out. –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 18:53
    
@Lucas: see the next hint in the edit answer. –  Vlad May 6 '12 at 19:10
    
I made it based on your and others advice! Thank you! (I edited the question and explained how I finally made it) –  Lucas Sartori May 6 '12 at 19:19

I think you should start by computing the prime factors of each number from 2 to 20. Since the desired number should be divisible by each number from 1 to 20, it must also be divisible by each prime factor of those numbers.

Furthermore, it is important keep track of the multiplicities of the prime factors. For example, 4 = 2 * 2, hence the desired number must be divisible by 2 * 2.

share|improve this answer

Something I quickly baked with Python 3:

primary_list = []
for i in range(2, 4097):
    j = i
    k = 2
    delta_list = primary_list[0:]
    alpha_list = []
    while j > 1:
        if j % k == 0:
            j /= k
            alpha_list.append(k)
            k = 2
        else:
            k += 1
    for i in alpha_list:
        try:
            delta_list.remove(i)
        except:
            primary_list.append(i)
final_number = 1
for i in primary_list:
    final_number *= i
print(final_number)

This computes in mere seconds under a slow machine. Python is very good with abstract numbers. The best tool for the job.

The algorithm is relatively simple. We have a basic list primary_list where we store the multiples of the numbers. Then comes the loop where we estimate the range of numbers that we want to compute. We use a temporary variable j as a number that can be easily divided, chopped and conquered. We use k as the divisor, starting as 2. The delta_list is the main working copy of the primary_list where we take apart number after number until only the required "logic" is left. Then we add those numbers to our primary list.

1: 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
4: 2 2 1
5: 5 1
6: 2 3 1
7: 7 1
8: 2 2 2 1
9: 3 3 1
10: 2 5 1

The final number is found by multiplying the numbers that we have in the primary_list.
1 * 2 * 3 * 2 * 5 * 7 * 2 * 3 = 2520

As said, Python is _really_ good with numbers. It's the best tool for the job. That's why you should use it instead of C, Erlang, Go, D or any other dynamic / static language for Euler exercises.

share|improve this answer

I solved it using C. Below is the algorithm!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
 int i;
 int count;
 for(i=21;i>0;i++)
  {  count = 0;
  for( int j=2;j<21;j++)
 {
  if (i%j!=0)
  break;
  count++;
  } 
  if (count==19)
  break;
   }

 printf("%d\n",i);
 return 0;
   }
share|improve this answer

Just some thoughts about above comments,

@pg190 you say " it really only needs to be divisible by the primes between 1 and 20, i.e. 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19." take 9699690, does not devide by all value from 1-20.

So this might be a good solution,

Given the number set [1-20]

The Least Common Multiple can be computed as follows.

Ex. For numbers 2,6,9

Express them in prime multiplications 2 2

6 2 3

9 3 3

LCM = multiple of highest power of each prime number. = 2*3^2 = 18

This can be done to the problem in hand by expressing each number as prime multiplication and then do this math.

share|improve this answer
$num=20;
        for($j=19;$j>1;$j--)
        {
            $num= lcm($j,$num);
        }
        echo $num;
        function lcm($num1, $num2)
        {
            $lcm = ($num1*$num2)/(gcd($num1,$num2));
            return $lcm;
        }
        function gcd($n1,$n2)
        {
            $gcd=1;
            $min=$n1;
            if($n1>$n2)
            {
                $min=$n2;
            }
            for($i=$min;$i>1;$i--)
            {
                if($n1%$i==0 && $n2%$i==0)
                {
                    $gcd*=$i;
                    $n1/=$i;
                    $n2/=$i;
                }
            }
            return $gcd;
        }

solved in php

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