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This seems to be something that have been discussed by many. But unfortunately, I couldn't find an answer to my issue. Here is a piece of code on Javascript inheritance (from a book):

function Car() {
    var self = this;
    self.type = "Car"
    self.go = function() {
        console.log("Going...");
    };
};

Toyota = function() { console.log("Original called"); };
Toyota.prototype = new Car();
Toyota.prototype.constructor = function() {
    var self = this;
    self.type = "Toyota";
    self.go = function() {
        console.log("A Toyota car is going...");
    }
};
Toyota.prototype.isJapaneseCar = true;

function TestCar() {
    console.log("Toyota.prototype.constructor: " + Toyota.prototype.constructor);
    var t = new Toyota();
    console.log("t.constructor: " + t.constructor);
    console.log(t.type);
};

And the output in Firefox console:

Toyota.prototype.constructor: function () {
    var self = this;
    self.type = "Toyota";
    self.go = function () {
        console.log("A Toyota car is going...");
    };
    }
Original called
t.constructor: function () {
    var self = this;
    self.type = "Toyota";
    self.go = function () {
        console.log("A Toyota car is going...");
    };
    }
Car

From the output, it is shown that the new Toyota() call:

var t = new Toyota();

didn't invoke the Toyota.prototype.constructor function as expected, instead it still call the function defined in the first place:

Toyota = function() { console.log("Original called"); };

A post with high upvote count gave a fairly detailed explanation together with examples: it said "3. It executes the constructor function, using the new object whenever this is mentioned." Does the "constructor" mentioned refer to prototype.constructor? How are the following 3 lines related:

  1. Toyota = function() { console.log("Original called"); }
  2. Toyota.prototype.constructor = function() { ...
  3. var t = new Toyota();

[EDIT] What confuses me most is why the constructor (Toyota.prototype.constructor) is not invoked when I call new Toyota()?

share|improve this question
1  
Func.prototype.constructor should simply point to Func. The constructor function in your case is Toyota. –  Felix Kling May 6 '12 at 18:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The constructor property in prototype object contains a reference to the function that constructs instances of that type of object. Hope I'm not trying to confuse here.

For a string object you would see the constructor property referencing the String function (a.k.a constructor informally.)

console.log("".constructor); // would print function String() { [native code] }

which is why typically we would reassign the class (i.e., the function) constructor property to its own.

Toyota.prototype.constructor = Toyota;

var t = new Toyota();
console.log(t.constructor); // prints function Toyota() { /* definition */ }

Hope that answers your question.

share|improve this answer
    
What confuses me most is why the constructor (Toyota.prototype.constructor) is not invoked when I call new Toyota()? –  Jiaji Wu May 6 '12 at 19:36
    
Let me clarify myself, the constructor property is not being used when instantiating new objects. If you need to, you need to use the prototype object to do so by saying Toyota.prototype = new Honda();. In which case it is a prototype chain and whenever you are creating a Toyota object you are given a Honda object. This is how inheritance is done in JavaScript. –  g13n May 6 '12 at 20:12
    
First thanks to your answer and comment! One thing I'm still confused with: some function (in my example: function() { console.log("Original called"); }) still gets called when I call new Toyota(). Where is this function kept in Toyota? How can I 'override' it? And what does "the function that constructs instances of that type of object" (in your answer) mean? –  Jiaji Wu May 7 '12 at 2:49
    
@JiajiWu a function [object] becomes "special" when you invoke it using the new operator. Special in the sense that you get instance object this. Just try invoking Toyota() without new, it is possible but anything you assign to this becomes global. Okay, coming to your question about overriding, yes, you can "redefine" Toyota by saying function Toyota() { /* ... */ } –  g13n May 7 '12 at 3:34
    
Looks like the "constructor" that's invoked when I call new Toyota() is not the same as Toyota.prototype.constructor, and it can only be set internally when function Toyota is defined (correct me if I am wrong). Your first comment already answered the question, but since I am such a newbie in Javascript, I didn't realize that until now. Thanks! –  Jiaji Wu May 7 '12 at 12:56

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