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How to create an inline variable in the Play framework 2.x Scala template? Path from the Play's guide is not clear to me:

@defining(user.firstName + " " + user.lastName) { fullName =>
  <div>Hello @fullName</div>
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First you don't create a variable but a value meaning it's read only.

In your example you have created a value fullName which is accessible inside the curly brackets.

@defining("Farmor") { fullName =>
  <div>Hello @fullName</div>
}

Will print Hello Farmor

To define a value which is accessible globally in your template just embrace everything with your curly brackets.

E.g.

@defining("Value") { formId =>
  @main("Title") {
    @form(routes.Application.addPost, 'id -> formId) {
      @inputText(name = "content", required = true)
      <input type="submit" value="Create">
    }
  }
}

In the example you can use the value formId anywere.

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7  
ugly, convoluted! .... So much for all velocity/freemarker efforts to make views really clean and HTML-coder friendly. It seems that now the fashion is make html views a total mess sigh –  monzonj Oct 1 '13 at 13:40
    
I agree! I dislike this syntax very very much. –  droope Nov 4 '13 at 0:52

It's easy, span your block with code from the sample, then you will can use @fullName variable which has value:

user.firstName + " " + user.lastName
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If you don't want to use the @defining syntax you can define a reusable block which will be evaluated every time you use it:

@fullName = @{
  user.firstName + " " + user.lastName
}

<div>Hello @fullName</div>

With this same syntax you can also pass arguments to the block: https://github.com/playframework/Play20/blob/master/samples/scala/computer-database/app/views/list.scala.html

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Except a reusable block will be re-executed every time it is used, while the value of the defining block will only be computed once. –  kdkeck Nov 14 '13 at 21:09
    
Thanks, edited. –  OlivierBlanvillain Nov 15 '13 at 8:54

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