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Setup:

I have written a jQuery function to update table cells of table_2, when a row in table_1 is clicked. Here is what I have written:

    <script type="text/javascript">
        $("tr").live('click',function() {
            var host = $(this);
            alert('A row in table 1 is clicked!');

            var count = host.find("td").eq(2).text();
            $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(0) td:eq(1)").text(count);
            $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(1) td:eq(1)").text(5);
        });
    </script>

The Problem:

When I step-through this function using FireBug, I can see the cell data in myTable_2 is being changed. BUT, for every click, the function is executed twice. I can see the alert box appearing twice for each click.

Can somebody tell me why does this happen? And how to avoid this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Either of the following:

  1. The clicked row is inside another row (two rows are clicked). (example)
  2. The code you've shown is executed twice (example).

To solve this, make your selector more specific. If you're using jQuery 1.7+, use .on instead of live: http://jsfiddle.net/6UmpY/3/

$(document).on("click", "#myTable_1 > tbody > tr", function() {
    // This selector will only match direct rows of the myTable_1 table

Note: Using .on instead of live did not solve the problem.
Using a more specific selector did fix the issue.
If you love live, the following would also work: http://jsfiddle.net/6UmpY/4/

$("#myTable_1 > tbody > tr").live("click", function() {
share|improve this answer

assume table_1 is the id of first table.

$("#table_1 tbody").on('click','tr', function() {
            var host = $(this);
            alert('A row in table 1 is clicked!');

            var count = host.find("td").eq(2).text();
            $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(0) td:eq(1)").text(count);
            $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(1) td:eq(1)").text(5);
        });

NOTE: live() has been deprecated, so write like above. you code execute twice because tr selector belongs to both tables and event bind twice.

You can also use delegate():

$("#table_1 tbody").delegate("tr", "click", function(){
     var host = $(this);
     alert('A row in table 1 is clicked!');
     var count = host.find("td").eq(2).text();
     $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(0) td:eq(1)").text(count);
     $("#myTable_2 tr:eq(1) td:eq(1)").text(5);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. So you mean using 'on' or delegate will solve the problem of function getting called twice? –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 19:38
    
@Learner no on() is used to bind event in from jquery 1.7+, and twice event fire will solve by using #table_1, because it will select only tr that belongs to first table –  thecodeparadox May 6 '12 at 19:40
    
thanks thecodeparadox. –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 19:40
    
+1. thanks a lot. –  Bhushan May 6 '12 at 20:00

just simply avoid the propagation of the click

$("tr").live('click',function() {

        ...

        $( event.toElement ).one('click', function(e){ e.stopImmediatePropagation(); } );
    });
share|improve this answer

It is because $("tr").live('click',function() {}); ^^^^^ has 2 counts in the html. To ensure .live () or .delegate() is executed once, the selector in $(selector).delegate() is better to be "$(table[name=users])" rather than $('td') or $('tr')

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