Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I allocate and transfer(to and from Host) 2D arrays in device memory in Cuda?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I found a solution to this problem. I didn't have to flatten the array.

The inbuilt cudaMallocPitch() function did the job. And I could transfer the array to and from device using cudaMemcpy2D() function.

For example

cudaMallocPitch((void**) &array, &pitch, a*sizeof(float), b);

This creates a 2D array of size a*b with the pitch as passed in as parameter.

The following code creates a 2D array and loops over the elements. It compiles readily, you may use it.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<cuda.h>
#define height 50
#define width 50

// Device code
__global__ void kernel(float* devPtr, int pitch)
{
    for (int r = 0; r < height; ++r) {
        float* row = (float*)((char*)devPtr + r * pitch);
        for (int c = 0; c < width; ++c) {
             float element = row[c];
        }
    }
}

//Host Code
int main()
{

float* devPtr;
size_t pitch;
cudaMallocPitch((void**)&devPtr, &pitch, width * sizeof(float), height);
kernel<<<100, 512>>>(devPtr, pitch);
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
is it possible to allocate a new row for the array later on? –  scatman Apr 12 '11 at 6:08

Flatten it: make it one-dimensional. See how it's done here

share|improve this answer

Your device code could be faster. Try utilizing the threads more.

__global__ void kernel(float* devPtr, int pitch)
{
    int r = threadIdx.x;

    float* row = (float*)((char*)devPtr + r * pitch);
    for (int c = 0; c < width; ++c) {
         float element = row[c];
    }
}

Then you calculate the blocks and threads allocation appropriate so that each thread deals with a single element.

share|improve this answer
    
The code Gitmo posted is a useless sample from the docs. Yes, your version is faster, but how do you do this in parallel for rows and columns? Strictly speaking you could have a mess in your hands because you don't check if r is less than the actual number of rows –  pelesl Jun 19 at 0:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.