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I know RubyMotion is relatively new, but I'd like to find out if it's possible/easy to use OpenGL ES with it before I buy a license to make an iOS game I've been planning for a while.

The reason I'm wondering is that I understand RubyMotion wraps all the Cocoa/Objective-C stuff but OpenGL on iOS is a set of C functions (glBegin(), glEnd(), etc.)

If anyone that purchased RubyMotion could help me out in finding out or point me to a piece of documentation, I'd be extremely grateful. Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

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Yes, it is. The official site says so.

Interfacing with C

You do not need to be a C programmer in order to use RubyMotion, however some basic notions, explained in this section, will be required. Objective-C is a superset of the C language. Objective-C methods can therefore accept and return C types. Also, while Objective-C is the main programming language used in the iOS SDK, some frameworks are only available in C APIs. RubyMotion comes with an interface that allows Ruby to deal with the C part of APIs.

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Didn't stumble onto that part of the site by myself. Thank you very much! –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois May 6 '12 at 21:03
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I have used CoreImage/Quartz with RubyMotion in this sample app: github.com/HipByte/RubyMotionSamples/tree/master/Trollify So yes, C APIs work just fine and I'm sure that includes OpenGL ES. –  Johannes Fahrenkrug May 7 '12 at 14:33
    
is that app in app store? :) –  Sergio Tulentsev May 7 '12 at 14:35

Yes.

They have a working demo in the RubyMotionSample project https://github.com/HipByte/RubyMotionSamples/tree/master/HelloGL

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It just lacks some comments for non OpenGL users =). –  DarkDeny Jan 5 '13 at 20:43

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