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The application I am creating uses mostly selects but some are inserts, updates, etc. I was wondering which is the best for performance under these circumstances.

Secondly, when I have two tables related in innodb, how do I delete a row if it related to a row in another table without it spitting out errors?

And lastly, if I insert into one table, will it automatically fill in the foreign key of the related table or do I have do program this in?

This application is written in PHP.

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Purely performance-wise MyISAM historically (had?) the edge over InnoDB.

But considering that MyISAM does not fully support referential integrity constraints and transactions and used / uses table level locking I would definitely go for InnoDB. What you are risking is data integrity here, and you'd need a special scenario to warrant a need for MyISAM in my honest opinion.

Regarding your questions considering related tables: just give the wanted cascade options to your foreign key constraints.

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Right now the only advantage MyISAM has is fulltext support, and even that's now in InnoDB as of MySQL 5.6(5.5?) somewhere. There's very very little reason to use MyISAM unless you truly do not need rowlevel locking and/or transactions. –  Marc B May 6 '12 at 22:39

The application I am creating uses mostly selects but some are inserts, updates, etc. I was wondering which is the best for performance under these circumstances.

The more important question: does it matter if your data gets corrupted? If it does, you need transactions, which means MyISAM is out. THEN you can start caring about performance because only then have you achieved the first and most important performance improvement: where the app goes from not working to working.

Secondly, when I have two tables related in innodb, how do I delete a row if it related to a row in another table without it spitting out errors?

Either by deleting the related row(s) first, or by defining the foreign key constraint with ON DELETE CASCADE - then it deletes related rows automatically; a dangerous feature.

And lastly, if I insert into one table, will it automatically fill in the foreign key of the related table or do I have do program this in?

No, and yes. It's not magic - how can the application know what the other columns should contain, or whether you actually want an entry at all?

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uses mostly selects but some are inserts, updates

Depends. What is the volume of reads to writes? 80%? 90%? 95%? Are the writes interleaved with the reads or carried out in batches? What level of concurrent access is there on the database? Are there specific tables which are write heavy?

MyISAM is much faster for reads, but since it locks the whole table for writes, this is where overall throughput drops compared with Innodb.

For a data warehouse with an overnight ETL, again MyISAM has a net performance benefit. For a non-transactional CMS (think simple publishing tool) again MyISAM is probable faster. For a typical web-based shop, you'd expect to see more than 95% reads, writes would be mostly isolated to specific tables and would be updating few rows at a time - here it's a bit more marginal, and the best solution might be a hybrid approach. OTOH for a database with frequent updates and lots of concurrent access (e.g. for storing session data) innodb is the way to go.

when I have two tables related in innodb, how do I delete a row if it related to a row in another table without it spitting out errors?

Use innodb and declare foreign key constraints

if I insert into one table, will it automatically fill in the foreign key of the related table

How does mysql know what data to put in the table? How many rows to add? ou need to do this yourself.

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