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Here is the problem. A restroom can be used by either male or female at a time. If male or female is/are in the restroom at given time, the opposing sex can't enter the restroom and have to wait. Once all the female are out, then males can enter.so, here is my solution:

I want to perform synchronization among threads using semaphores and mutex. I am still not clear about how to implement it. Here is what I have in mind:

  • create a mutex to lock/unlock the threads.(lock the restroom)
  • create a semaphore for counting the number of people in restroom. one for each sex
  • semaphore male_in_restroom;
  • semaphore female_in_restroom;
  • Queue for waiting male,
  • Queue for waiting female,

So at first, I check what sex is the process and then I check if the semphore for the opposing sex is greater than one. If not I let them enter the restroom. But if there is already member of opposing sex in the restroom, I need to make this process wait and put it to sleep.

How do I exactly make this process to sleep? I've looked for some examples but still not sure how to do it.

An example with the function signature for wait() and signal() would be really helpful.

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2  
How about waiting for a condition variable? –  Kerrek SB May 6 '12 at 21:25
    
This is not your question, but you don't need two semaphores. A variable to keep track of the sex and a single semaphore would be enough. –  vhallac May 6 '12 at 21:37
    
This is so incredibly not the way the real world works. Boy+girl in one bathroom is a distinct possibility, take at least 10 minutes. Model the way the world works on your own terms. –  Hans Passant May 6 '12 at 22:06

2 Answers 2

"create a semaphore for counting the number of people in restroom. one for each sex semaphore male_in_restroom; semaphore female_in_restroom; Queue for waiting male, Queue for waiting female,"

Doesn't really make sense. The purpose of the semaphore value is to indicate whether a resource is available or not. If the value is zero, the resource is unavailable. If it is more than zero, it is available. So if you somehow manage to increment the sem count by using the resource, what purpose can the semaphore have?

So at first, I check what sex is the process and then I check if the semphore for the opposing sex is greater than one. If not I let them enter the restroom.

NO NO NO! You have it bass akward. Which emphasizes the point: semaphores are not for storing arbitrary values.

Your various counts, etc, are normal variables, not semaphores, however, you must use mutexes/semaphores/condition variables (most likely: mutex + condition variable) in order to control access to them.

Also, I don't know why you think it is useful or significant to track how many people are waiting.

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This looked interesting enough, so I wrote some code. Haven't tested it though, so might have screwed something up, but it's clear enough to demonstrate the idea that I had.

typedef enum {
    none = -1,
    male = 0,
    female = 1
} sex_t;

class Human {
public:
    const sex_t id;
    Human(sex_t id_) : id(id_) {assert(id != none);}
};

class Restroom {
    tbb::spin_mutex     door_mutex;
    tbb::atomic<size_t> num_waiting;
    HANDLE              opposite_sex_can_enter;

    // these two variables need not be atomic, they're not accessed concurrently
    sex_t               current_occupying_sex;
    size_t              num_visitors;

public:
    Restroom() : current_occupying_sex(none), num_visitors(0) {
        num_waiting = 0;
        opposite_sex_can_enter = CreateEvent(0, TRUE, FALSE, 0);
    }

    void enter(const Human& h) {
        tbb::spin_mutex::scoped_lock lock(door_mutex);
        // this prevents any two humans trying to open the door (in any direction) at the same time :)
        if(current_occupying_sex == none) {
            // you're the first one in, so update the 'restroom id' and enter
            assert(num_visitors == 0 && num_waiting == 0);
            // if the knowledge of SetEvent has not propagated all the way yet and the same sex
            // person happens to walk into the restroom again, opposite sex people need to know
            // that they were slow and will need to wait again
            ResetEvent(opposite_sex_can_enter);
            current_occupying_sex = h.id;
            ++num_visitors;
        } else if(h.id == current_occupying_sex) {
            // you're not the first one in, but you're of the same sex, so you can just walk in
            assert(num_visitors > 0);
            ++num_visitors;
        } else {
            // you're not the first one in and you're of opposite sex, so you'll need to wait
            // first, let go of the door, you're not getting in :)
            lock.release();
            // then join the rest of the opposite sex people waiting
            ++num_waiting;
            WaitForSingleObject(opposite_sex_can_enter);
            --num_waiting;
            if(num_waiting == 0) {
                ResetEvent(opposite_sex_can_enter);
            }
            enter(h);
        }
    }

    void exit() {
        tbb::spin_mutex::scoped_lock lock(door_mutex);
        if(--num_visitors == 0) {
            current_occupying_sex = none;
            SetEvent(opposite_sex_can_enter);
            // fairness can be imposed here, meaning that if you're the last say, male
            // to walk out, you can check if females are waiting and switch the 
            // restroom sex id to female. The logic of enter() will change a little bit, but not radically.
        }
    }
};
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sorry, make a mistake in the call to WaitForSingleObject, needs to be WaitForSingleObject(opposite_sex_can_enter, INFINITE); –  Anton Pegushin May 11 '12 at 10:03

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