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I've been doing some research on how to update an existing record using LINQ, but I'm not having any luck. This is the method I've created - intellisense does not like the db.SubmitChanges().

public void updateRestaurant(int RestID, int HoursID, string Web, string Desc)
{
    RestaurantsEntities db = new RestaurantsEntities();
    RESTAURANT restDetails = (from RESTAURANT in db.RESTAURANTs
                                    where RESTAURANT.REST_ID == RestID
                                    select RESTAURANT).Single();
    restDetails.HOURS_ID = HoursID;
    restDetails.REST_WEBSITE = Web;
    restDetails.REST_DESC = Desc;

    db.SubmitChanges();
}
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db here is meant to refer to your DataContext object, but I don't see it declared here. Are you sure that's properly declared and instantiated? –  McGarnagle May 6 '12 at 22:31
    
I have added the declaration. I just didn't include in the example. –  Susan May 6 '12 at 23:01
1  
SubmitChanges() = Linq-to-SQL, on the DataContext class; in Entity Framework, it's called SaveChanges() on the ObjectContext (or DbContext) class –  marc_s May 7 '12 at 5:30
    
Perfect .... that's what I needed. Thanks so much! –  Susan May 9 '12 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

Try using db.SaveChanges();

    public void updateRestaurant(int RestID, int HoursID, string Web, string Desc)
    {
        RestaurantsEntities db = new RestaurantsEntities();
        RESTAURANT restDetails = (from RESTAURANT in db.RESTAURANTs
                                        where RESTAURANT.REST_ID == RestID
                                        select RESTAURANT).Single();
        restDetails.HOURS_ID = HoursID;
        restDetails.REST_WEBSITE = Web;
        restDetails.REST_DESC = Desc;
        db.SaveChanges();
    }
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Your creating an instance of an object in your link graph.

This is incorrect. You need to create an instance of your object context, it starts with the file name of your linq graph and ends in DataContext. Eg if your link file is called myDb then your context name is myDbDataContext.

RestaurantsEntities db = new RestaurantsEntities();
RESTAURANT restDetails = db.RESTAURANTs.single(c=>c.REST_ID == RestID);
restDetails.HOURS_ID = HoursID;
restDetails.REST_WEBSITE = Web;
restDetails.REST_DESC = Desc;
db.SubmitChanges();

this is assuming an object in your context is called RESTAURANT.

You are required to use the context so that the context can manage what you want to insert, update and delete and at the same time maintain relationships. You are unable to create instances of objects and then apply them to your context. They must be created via context.

In reply to comment and update:
I am just not thinking straight. I've updated my code but its not going to help. I'm fairly sure your doing everything correctly

Have a look at this question and this post

UPDATE
I think its your query thats giving you trouble. It's disconnected from your context. Try the linq code i provided above.

share|improve this answer
    
I've added the instantiation of my context to my example (I had not included it before. The changes your recommend in prefacing RESTAURANT with the context name, give RED underlines. It also only allows from intellisense the plural of RESTAURANT. It says that RestuarantEntities.RESTAURANTs cannot be assigned -- it is read only. –  Susan May 6 '12 at 23:00
    
So I've updated my answer a few times, check the update at the bottom and the amended code. –  MrJD May 7 '12 at 1:41

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