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How to split the CSV file in c sharp? And how to display this?

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Important reading regarding CSV: creativyst.com/Doc/Articles/CSV/CSV01.htm#CSVariations –  Stobor Jun 26 '09 at 5:57
1  
Not very precise, your question... if you give more details, you'll get more useful answers. –  Benjol Jun 26 '09 at 6:02
    
simply, i mean i have to read a string that i entered, and split up and stores into an array. –  MAC Jun 26 '09 at 6:06
1  
@Nisam: what Benjol meant is that if you show actual examples of how the strings look like, it will be easier to provide examples of how to split them. –  Fredrik Mörk Jun 26 '09 at 6:14
    
Ok. i have one CSV file named address.csv (i have no code example), I have to just split the contents of the file. –  MAC Jun 26 '09 at 6:21
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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a CSV parser I use on occasion.

Usage: (dgvMyView is a datagrid type.)

CSVReader reader = new CSVReader("C:\MyFile.txt");
reader.DisplayResults(dgvMyView);

Class:

using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Windows.Forms;    
public class CSVReader
{
    private const string ESCAPE_SPLIT_REGEX = "({1}[^{1}]*{1})*(?<Separator>{0})({1}[^{1}]*{1})*";
    private string[] FieldNames;
    private List<string[]> Records;
    private int ReadIndex;

    public CSVReader(string File)
    {
        Records = new List<string[]>();
        string[] Record = null;
        StreamReader Reader = new StreamReader(File);
        int Index = 0;
        bool BlankRecord = true;

        FieldNames = GetEscapedSVs(Reader.ReadLine());
        while (!Reader.EndOfStream)
        {
            Record = GetEscapedSVs(Reader.ReadLine());
            BlankRecord = true;
            for (Index = 0; Index <= Record.Length - 1; Index++)
            {
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Record[Index])) BlankRecord = false;
            }
            if (!BlankRecord) Records.Add(Record);
        }
        ReadIndex = -1;
        Reader.Close();
    }

    private string[] GetEscapedSVs(string Data)
    {
        return GetEscapedSVs(Data, ",", "\"");
    }
    private string[] GetEscapedSVs(string Data, string Separator, string Escape)
    {
        string[] Result = null;
        int Index = 0;
        int PriorMatchIndex = 0;
        MatchCollection Matches = Regex.Matches(Data, string.Format(ESCAPE_SPLIT_REGEX, Separator, Escape));

        Result = new string[Matches.Count];


        for (Index = 0; Index <= Result.Length - 2; Index++)
        {
            Result[Index] = Data.Substring(PriorMatchIndex, Matches[Index].Groups["Separator"].Index - PriorMatchIndex);
            PriorMatchIndex = Matches[Index].Groups["Separator"].Index + Separator.Length;
        }
        Result[Result.Length - 1] = Data.Substring(PriorMatchIndex);

        for (Index = 0; Index <= Result.Length - 1; Index++)
        {
            if (Regex.IsMatch(Result[Index], string.Format("^{0}[^{0}].*[^{0}]{0}$", Escape))) Result[Index] = Result[Index].Substring(1, Result[Index].Length - 2);
            Result[Index] = Result[Index].Replace(Escape + Escape, Escape);
            if (Result[Index] == null) Result[Index] = "";
        }

        return Result;
    }

    public int FieldCount
    {
        get { return FieldNames.Length; }
    }

    public string GetString(int Index)
    {
        return Records[ReadIndex][Index];
    }

    public string GetName(int Index)
    {
        return FieldNames[Index];
    }

    public bool Read()
    {
        ReadIndex = ReadIndex + 1;
        return ReadIndex < Records.Count;
    }


    public void DisplayResults(DataGridView DataView)
    {
        DataGridViewColumn col = default(DataGridViewColumn);
        DataGridViewRow row = default(DataGridViewRow);
        DataGridViewCell cell = default(DataGridViewCell);
        DataGridViewColumnHeaderCell header = default(DataGridViewColumnHeaderCell);
        int Index = 0;
        ReadIndex = -1;

        DataView.Rows.Clear();
        DataView.Columns.Clear();

        for (Index = 0; Index <= FieldCount - 1; Index++)
        {
            col = new DataGridViewColumn();
            col.CellTemplate = new DataGridViewTextBoxCell();
            header = new DataGridViewColumnHeaderCell();
            header.Value = GetName(Index);
            col.HeaderCell = header;
            DataView.Columns.Add(col);
        }

        while (Read())
        {
            row = new DataGridViewRow();
            for (Index = 0; Index <= FieldCount - 1; Index++)
            {
                cell = new DataGridViewTextBoxCell();
                cell.Value = GetString(Index).ToString();
                row.Cells.Add(cell);
            }
            DataView.Rows.Add(row);
        }
    }
}
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I've been using the TextFieldParser Class in the Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO namespace for a C# project I'm working on. It will handle complications such as embedded commas or fields that are enclosed in quotes etc. It returns a string[] and, in addition to CSV files, can also be used for parsing just about any type of structured text file.

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Interesting. I've never looked here before. I recently wrote a complete CSV class in C#, and this would have helped. I wound up converting newlines to ~'s, and well, commas could only occur in the last field, so I used the maxentries parameter of String.Split to capture the entire last field, commas and all, but I'll have to look at this class. Thanks for the link. –  maxwellb Jun 26 '09 at 8:17
1  
Order for 'common' functionality 1) Core Framework 2) Extended Framework 3) Open Source Library 4) Cheap Paid for Library 5) Write it yourself –  AndyM Apr 27 '10 at 13:26
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Display where? About splitting, the best way is to use a good library to that effect.

This library is pretty good, I can recommend it heartily.

The problems using naïve methods is that the usually fail, there are tons of considerations without even thinking about performance:

  • What if the text contains commas
  • Support for the many existing formats (separated by semicolon, or text surrounded by quotes, or single quotes, etc.)
  • and many others
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read the file one line at a time, then ...

foreach (String line in line.Split(new char[] { ',' }))
    Console.WriteLine(line);
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Unfortunately this doesn't work if the values have embedded commas or fields are enclosed in quotes. Try the TextFieldParser class instead. –  Graham Jun 26 '09 at 6:38
    
Yeah I relalized that shortly after providing this example >.< It is easily overcome though, just keep a tally of the number of "'s and only split when there have been an even number, and don't count escaped ones :) So I guess you would have to tokenize the string before splitting. This complexity is what 3'rd party libraries help with. –  Nippysaurus Jun 26 '09 at 6:54
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I had got the result for my query. its like simple like i had read a file using io.file. and all the text are stored into a string. After that i splitted with a seperator. The code is shown below.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

namespace CSV
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            string csv = "Nizam, Babu, Arun,James,Neal";

            string[] split = csv.Split(new char[] {',',' '});
            foreach(string s in split)
            {
                if (s.Trim() != "")
                    Console.WriteLine(s);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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I'm glad you found a solution. If you need to look further in depth to CSV files, you may want to have a look at some of the other methods and links posted here. It seems like you are aware of the exact format that your CSV's will be in. Also, consider the file sizes. A string representing the entire CSV is okay up to a couple of megabytes, but take a look at the Codeproject link posted by Vinko if you're dealing with large files. Even if you don't need to use them in this example, you should make sure you understand what StringSplitOptions and the "count" parameter to String.Split do. :-) –  maxwellb Jun 26 '09 at 8:29
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The following function takes a line from a CSV file and splits it into a List<string>.

Arguments:
string line = the line to split
string textQualifier = what (if any) text qualifier (i.e. "" or "\"" or "'")
char delim = the field delimiter (i.e. ',' or ';' or '|' or '\t')
int colCount = the expected number of fields (0 means don't check)

Example usage:

List<string> fields = SplitLine(line, "\"", ',', 5);
// or
List<string> fields = SplitLine(line, "'", '|', 10);
// or
List<string> fields = SplitLine(line, "", '\t', 0);

Function:

private List<string> SplitLine(string line, string textQualifier, char delim, int colCount)
{
    List<string> fields = new List<string>();
    string origLine = line;

    char textQual = '"';
    bool hasTextQual = false;
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(textQualifier))
    {
        hasTextQual = true;
        textQual = textQualifier[0];            
    }

    if (hasTextQual)
    {
        while (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(line))
        {
            if (line[0] == textQual) // field is text qualified so look for next unqualified delimiter
            {
                int fieldLen = 1;
                while (true)
                {
                    if (line.Length == 2) // must be final field (zero length)
                    {
                        fieldLen = 2;
                        break;
                    }
                    else if (fieldLen + 1 >= line.Length) // must be final field
                    {
                        fieldLen += 1;
                        break;
                    }
                    else if (line[fieldLen] == textQual && line[fieldLen + 1] == textQual) // escaped text qualifier
                    {
                        fieldLen += 2;
                    }
                    else if (line[fieldLen] == textQual && line[fieldLen + 1] == delim) // must be end of field
                    {
                        fieldLen += 1;
                        break;
                    }
                    else // not a delimiter
                    {
                        fieldLen += 1;
                    }
                }
                string escapedQual = textQual.ToString() + textQual.ToString();
                fields.Add(line.Substring(1, fieldLen - 2).Replace(escapedQual, textQual.ToString())); // replace escaped qualifiers
                if (line.Length >= fieldLen + 1)
                {
                    line = line.Substring(fieldLen + 1);
                    if (line == "") // blank final field
                    {
                        fields.Add("");
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    line = "";
                }
            }
            else // field is not text qualified
            {
                int fieldLen = line.IndexOf(delim);
                if (fieldLen != -1) // check next delimiter position
                {
                    fields.Add(line.Substring(0, fieldLen));
                    line = line.Substring(fieldLen + 1);
                    if (line == "") // final field must be blank 
                    {
                        fields.Add("");
                    }
                }
                else // must be last field
                {
                    fields.Add(line);
                    line = "";
                }
            }
        }
    }
    else // if there is no text qualifier, then use existing split function
    {
        fields.AddRange(line.Split(delim));
    }      

    if (colCount > 0 && colCount != fields.Count) // count doesn't match expected so throw exception
    {
        throw new Exception("Field count was:" + fields.Count.ToString() + ", expected:" + colCount.ToString() + ". Line:" + origLine);

    }
    return fields;
}
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Import Micorosoft.VisualBasic as a reference (I know, its not that bad) and use Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser - this handles CSV files very well, and can be used in any .Net language.

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Why the -1? This is a great CSV parser... –  cjk May 25 '12 at 11:03
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