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We want to invite a third party for reviewing our code and they want to know a ball park figure of number of lines of code we have in all our applications!

Depending on the coding style of each of developer and depending on the language chosen there can be significant difference by measuring the LOC.

I am really interested in knowing, how you counted your number of Lines Of Code (if at all if you ever did)?

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Also check this discussion as well –  Prakash Sep 19 '08 at 19:26
    
Visual Studio Add-In –  CrashTECH Sep 19 '08 at 19:31
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I can't answer since this question is closed but you can actually do this in Visual Studio. Right click on project or solution and select "Calculate Code Metrics". You'll get that and much more information (complexity, maintainability, inheritance depth, etc). –  Ken May 15 '13 at 11:35
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(In POSIX OS with command:) wc -l find . -iname "*.php" –  leticia Nov 29 '13 at 18:12
    
for me it's very simple find -name *.php | xargs cat | wc -l will find all php files recursively in the sub-folders also and count the no of line –  veer7 Dec 12 '13 at 12:29
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19 Answers

up vote 128 down vote accepted

Code Analyzer is simple tool which generates this kind of metrics. Not limited to java!

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What exactly is "Code Lines" is that physical or logical lines of code? –  prolink007 Jan 6 '12 at 19:35
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While not limited to Java, the languages it supports does seem limited. Unless I'm missing something it's C/C++, Java, Assembly (seems like an odd inclusion, usually at the assembler level I'm not thinking in terms of code metrics like LOC), and HTML (very odd choice, since it's a markup language and not a general PL). No Python, Ruby, Perl, etc. –  Adam Parkin Apr 18 '12 at 16:15
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It would be awesome if it supported C#. –  Contango Aug 26 '12 at 20:51
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One of the ugliest UIs though... –  yegor256 Sep 9 '12 at 11:20
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@AdamParkin If you go into the tools > extension sets drop down you can add any file type extension. The 4 listed items in the drop down are the comment types that are supported which includes /* */ for c, this covers most languages such as css, php, html and gives a good indication of lines. I've made a web development extension set which includes: *.php *.js *.css *.html *.htaccess *.ini *.htpasswd *.txt –  Silver89 Feb 3 '13 at 3:54
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There's a perl program called CLOC that you can use. It is also available as a windows binary:

cloc counts blank lines, comment lines, and physical lines of source code in many programming languages. ... cloc is known to run on many flavors of Linux, AIX, Solaris, IRIX, z/OS, and Windows. (To run the Perl source version of cloc on Windows one needs ActiveState Perl 5.6.1 or higher, or Cygwin installed. Alternatively one can use the Windows binary of cloc generated with perl2exe to run on Windows computers that have neither Perl nor Cygwin.)

It can produce a lot of statistics, depending on your code base, but most people will use less languages that their example:

Unix> cloc --sum-reports --report_file=script_lang perl-5.8.8.txt python-2.4.2.txt
Wrote script_lang.lang
Wrote script_lang.file

Unix> cat script_lang.lang
http://cloc.sourceforge.net v 0.72
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Language          files     blank   comment      code    scale   3rd gen. equiv
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
C                   409     46920     35958    383652 x   0.77 =      295412.04
Python             1605     55998     31886    309549 x   4.20 =     1300105.80
Perl               1576     74568     89136    220919 x   4.00 =      883676.00
C/C++ Header        280     12169     26366     88089 x   1.00 =       88089.00
Bourne Shell        146      5201      7428     52115 x   3.81 =      198558.15
Lisp                  4      1120      2291      9799 x   1.25 =       12248.75
Make                 17      1092       939      5348 x   2.50 =       13370.00
Teamcenter def       10       144        88      3163 x   1.00 =        3163.00
HTML                 22       516         2      2769 x   1.90 =        5261.10
yacc                  2       125        72      1047 x   1.51 =        1580.97
XML                   2       103        32       894 x   1.90 =        1698.60
Objective C           6       102        19       704 x   2.96 =        2083.84
C++                   4       104       215       451 x   1.51 =         681.01
DOS Batch            14        93        73       387 x   0.63 =         243.81
Expect                1         0         0        60 x   2.00 =         120.00
Java                  2         6         1        23 x   1.36 =          31.28
sed                   1         0         1         2 x   4.00 =           8.00
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SUM:               4101    198261    194507   1078971 x   2.60 =     2806331.35
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Thanks, this was really useful. –  Pete Hodgson Dec 15 '09 at 21:55
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CLOC rocks. It's quick. It needs little configuration. It autodetects most of what I need and auto ignores source control files. Very nice –  Peter Kahn Apr 20 '11 at 14:32
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If you're running Mac OS X, there's a Homebrew package for cloc now. –  julien_c Jan 11 '12 at 16:30
    
How do you get it to include whitespaces? –  Stephane Grenier May 23 '12 at 3:59
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CLOC perfectly worked, fast, smart, thanks –  fifth Aug 15 '12 at 2:12
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I'm dismayed by the use of cat.

find . -regex '.+\.cc$' | xargs cat | wc

is the same as

find . -regex '.+\.cc$' | xargs wc

and

cat *.java | grep '[;{]' | wc -l

is the same as

grep '[;{]' *.java | wc -l

or even

grep -c '[;{]' *.java

One rarely needs to use cat.

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Despite you being dismayed, your examples were better than any other method. Thanks! –  bentford May 4 '09 at 7:37
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I like the evil smiley: [;{] –  java.is.for.desktop Oct 26 '09 at 9:45
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Actually, cat IS necessary for large projects. xargs potentially breaks up calls to wc into multiple calls depending on the allowed command line width of the platform. Thus, if you have long path names and numerous files you'll get multiple calls to wc which will in turn break wc's totals across calls. OTOH, cat'ing the files to wc pipes all the lines to wc in a single execution which will preserve the total across multiple calls to cat. –  jeckhart May 24 '11 at 20:49
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grep -r might be helpful for recursively stepping into directories. Else: Use find. But I guess -r doesn't work well with filename patterns like ".java" - it would only step into directories named like ".java". find -name "*.c" -exec cat {} + | grep -c '[;{]' reveals in a minute 2560071 lines in /usr/src/linux. –  user unknown Jun 22 '12 at 1:18
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I'd be hard pressed to think that "wc -l " on every file in your source tree isn't a good enough estimate of LOC.

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The problem there is well documented code seems like more work that code with no comments at all. –  Andrew Johnson Sep 19 '08 at 19:29
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Why is that a problem? Well-documented code is more work. –  Ben Collins Sep 19 '08 at 19:38
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Well documented code is more work to produce in the first place, but it should be less work to review and maintain. I guess it depend on what you want the numbers for, but you can't really measure productivity through LOC. –  Andrew Johnson Sep 21 '08 at 5:35
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wc -l also counts blank lines if memory serves. So coders who make use of excessive whitespace will mislead the counts. –  Adam Parkin Apr 18 '12 at 16:08
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@Andrew More work ? I thought it was more work to produce less code! We would all agree that writing reusable code is a virtue and a challenge. –  ScrollerBlaster Apr 24 '12 at 12:13
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I've used cloc a number of times to do this sort of thing. It's quick and dirty and it works for a large number of languages/file types, giving you a breakdown of how many lines there are in which languages.

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cloc is pretty cool. Thanks! –  Forgotten Semicolon Sep 19 '08 at 19:39
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I've used a single line of PowerShell from my blog

ls * -recurse -include *.aspx, *.ascx, *.cs, *.ps1 | Get-Content | Measure-Object -Line
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Do you count method signature declaration? Do you count lines with only bracket? Do you count several lines when a single method call is written on several lines because of a high number of parameters? Do you count ‘namespaces’ and ‘using namespace’ declaration? Do you count interface and abstract methods declaration? Do you count fields assignment when they are declared? Do you count blank line?

The only proper way to count the number of Lines of Code (LOC) is to get a logical number of LOC, meaning ignoring any code style impact. This way you can compare and measure progression effectively.

In the .NET world, the logical LOC can be computed from the PDB files, the files that are used by the debugger to link the IL code with the source code. PDB files contains sequence points. A sequence point is used to mark a spot in the IL code that corresponds to a specific location in the original source.

The tool NDepend for.NET developers, counts the number of logical LOC thanks to sequence points, and get some special visualization features. By the way, NDepend comes with 82 other code metrics all listed here. Disclaimer: I am one of the developers of the tool

Here are some observations on logical LOC:

  • Interfaces, abstract methods and enumerations have a LOC equals to 0.
  • Only concrete code that is effectively executed is considered when computing LOC.
  • Namespaces, types, fields and methods declarations are not considered as line of code because they don’t have corresponding sequence points.
  • When the C# or VB.NET compiler faces an inline instance fields initialization, it generates a sequence point for each of the instance constructor (the same remark applies for inline static fields initialization and static constructor).
  • LOC computed from an anonymous method or a lambda expression doesn’t interfere with the LOC of its outer declaring methods.
  • The overall ratio between NbILInstructions and LOC (in C# and VB.NET) is usually around 7.
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Code without good comments is virtually unmaintainable. I wish there was some way to add a "comment quality" metric, so that well commented code scores more highly than code with no comments. –  Contango Aug 26 '12 at 20:46
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Ohloh's counter is very good: https://github.com/blackducksw/ohcount

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I'm currently using the freeware program SourceMonitor for a C# project, but it also provides analysis for other programming languages too (C++, C#, Java, VB.NET, Delphi, C, HTML, Visual Basic).

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I've used SourceMonitor on a C++ project, works quite nicely: easy to specify and filter input files, then can drill down to find methods that have largest complexity and fix. You can plot progress of metrics over time. –  Schollii Sep 16 '13 at 14:26
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On the rare occasions that this has been useful I have used a slight variation on EmmEff's "wc -l" (the following comments only apply to Java but can be adapted for other languages):

cat *.java | grep '[;{]' | wc -l

that is, to find the number of occurrences of semicolons and right braces, so that you have a measure of the number of actual statements in the system rather than the number of physical lines (including blanks). This fails if your developers put all their code on the same line, but if that's the case you are already in trouble and should consider reformatting all the code.

Edit: cloc is of course a much better tool than the above command. This is just the quick-and-dirty version.

It's a bit harder to measure other forms of "code": we also create lots of JSPs, object models (using a web-based tool so there is no text file involved) and of course populating databases with metadata can be an equivalent. Harder to use grep to measure all those, though you can come up with a proxy such as number of attributes in your data model, or number of records in the metadata tables.

The most sensible way to think of "lines of code" is to see them as the atomic unit of a programmer's thought. This is why high-level languages are much more productive both in time, and in lines of code - a single thought represents a much higher level of abstraction and therefore has more power. Simplifying drastically, a given programmer has the capacity for a given number of thoughts-per-hour, and so lines of code as a proxy for that is a (grudgingly) semi-legitimate measure.

I appreciate why a code review company would use it as a measure of their likely workload, though it is a bit unimaginative. Maybe you can persuade them to think instead in terms of the business value they are going to add through their services.

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This seems like a common mistake people make -- there is no reason to 'cat' *.java and then pipe the results through grep. Simply run: grep '[;{]' *.java | wc -l –  Trent Sep 19 '08 at 19:45
    
yes, good point. Not sure why I didn't put it like that. I think it is probably because I usually use 'find' on a directory structure and pipe the results into grep, and in that case it's harder to replicate the results of find with a simple wildcard. –  Leigh Caldwell Oct 7 '08 at 23:56
    
To search subdirectories, you should use find, or the -R flag of grep for recursive. –  user unknown Jun 22 '12 at 1:16
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If you want a measure that is independent of formatting, whitespace or comments, you can measure Cyclomatic Complexity and/or Halstead code volume.

How you measure these depend on the language syntax, so you generally will need a seperate metrics tool to compute these for each langauge. If you have a lot of langauges, you may not be able to measure everything at which point you have to fall back to something simpler.

Our SD Source Code Search Engine is nominally used to search large source code bases efficiently by indexing each code base in a language specific way. As a side effect of the indexing process, the Search Engine just so happens to compute Halstead and Cyclomatic measures (as well as a number of other simple measures) for each language it can handle, and it presently handles a lot of languages.

Whether the reviewing organization will accept these values as a measure of the code size is another matter. If you don't know them well, I'd use wc and call it a day.

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I would recommend you implement a Best Practice in code formatting. Then implement an application to format the code automatically (this works best with a continuous integration system). This way you don't have to worry if developers have their own style of coding since it will be automatically formatted once they check it into source control.

As far as how to get the line count across various languages, the easiest way is "wc -l" Granted their are other tools out there for counting lines of code (CLOC, SLOCCount), but that will work across all languages.

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Always using the same way of measuring is more important than which method you use.

Something simple like

find . -regex '.+\.cc$' | xargs cat | wc

Just counts all lines in cc files (on linux). Adding in .h files too would be better. More (like ignoring comments) is overkill and often leads to perverse incentives.

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I've used the Metrics plug-in for Eclipse: http://metrics.sourceforge.net/

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I have just tried Source Code Counter.

Easiest to use so far.

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For people who like to keep things simple: https://github.com/craigbarnes/tally

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NCrunch (C#, Visual Studio) gives totals on line counts, as well as being an excellent code-coverage tool.

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If it were perl -- I would use the Perl::tidy module because it doesn't count lines of code but rather lines of command. Or rather, it doesn't actually count but it would be very easy to add in code to allow it to count.

In other languages I would find a way to get that number from the interpreter/compiler or find one of many free tokenizers out there for source. Look for modules that help clean or tidy your code because they have built in tokenizers for each command and then it's a matter of adding a counter.

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I never used cloc, but I will give it a try.

I normally use sloccount - it also shows the COCOMA stuff - which always impresses me. Ohloh would be nicer with Mercurial support.. ;)

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