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One of the downfalls of the same origin policy is it doesn't support different ports or sub domains. As a result if you host your services on a sub domain like services.site.com you can't call the service from www.site.com without using JSONP.

Is there a way to configure your WCF service to only accept request from specific origins?

Example:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $("#Button").click(function () {
        $.getJSON("http://services.site.com/service.svc/myService?callback=?", function (data) {
            var jObj = $.parseJSON(data);
            $("#Result").html(jObj.MyValue);
        });
    });
});

If this was called from www.site.com I would want it to work. But if another site like www.example.com called it, I would want the WCF service to block it.

I tried configuring the web.config file to have:

<identity>
  <dns value="www.example.com"/>
</identity>

But when I tried calling from www.site.com it still worked fine. Which I believe is because I set crossDomainScriptAccessEnabled to true in order for JSONP to return the correct callback value. Only been working with WCF for a few days now.

Thanks in advance.

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Identity is used identify service to the client so that will not help prevent call being made to the service.

If this is a free service then authenticating and authorizing client is not necessary regardless where it comes from.

On the other hand if you want to protect the service then you need to authenticate/authorize client to the service regardless of the call origin. There are many resources about this topic:

MSDN Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) and Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) Samples for .NET Framework 4

SO Securing WCF Services

MSDN WCF Security Resources

Securing WCF Services: Using ASP.NET Membership & Role Providers

You could try to brute force to get client IP (which will work most of the time) by getting the remote endpoint like this in your method call or intercepting it somewhere in the vast WCF extensibility chain:

var messageProperty = OperationContext.Current.IncomingMessageProperties[RemoteEndpointMessageProperty.Name] as RemoteEndpointMessageProperty;

After that you can do reverse dns lookup but that might not always work too (proxy's, NATs, etc.)

Another quick point, using GET on JSON calls can lead to JSON Hijacking

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