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Will this loop execute exactly N Times ?

for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) 
{
    //statement
    someMethodCall();
}

Will this loop execute atmost N Times ?

for (int i = 1; i < N; i++)  
{
    someMethodCall();
}

Will this loop execute atleast N Times ?

for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++) 
{
    //statement
    someMethodCall();
}

How would I do if I need to execute statement between m and n times? For instance I want to call one method between m and n times?

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1  
Is it C# or C++? –  talnicolas May 7 '12 at 2:41
2  
What's with the "at least" or "at most"? A for loop is designed to go through a specific number of times when in that format. A break inside the loop would exit early, and formatting it differently would have various effects on the iterations (like going through a container). –  chris May 7 '12 at 2:42
    
Yes, yes, and yes. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 2:42

3 Answers 3

The answers to your three questions are yes, no, and yes, I suppose, although that third answer is a bit deceptive; it'll execute N times, no more and no less (unless there's an exception which terminates the loop abnormally.) You can write a for loop to loop a definite number of times, or until some condition becomes true, and then you have the ability to use break or return to terminate the loop early.

But there's no notion of executing "at least N times;" it's simply not part of this -- or any other -- computer language.

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Well, there's no doubt as to how many times the loop will execute, but I think all three statements are true if you ignore the horrible use of 'at least' and 'at most'. –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 2:44
    
@SethCarnegie -- the middle one will execute N-1 times, though, so "at most N" is definitely wrong, wouldn't you say? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 7 '12 at 2:45
1  
No, 'at most N' seems correct. It will not run more than N. (And yeah, 'at most' implies some non-determinism which is stupid.) –  Seth Carnegie May 7 '12 at 2:47
1  
@chris: at most doesn't mean it has to run N times, it could run 0 times and the statement is true. –  Jesse Good May 7 '12 at 2:49
1  
This is an interesting debate, folks, but I honestly think the poster had some odd delusion about nondeterminism in loop limits, and I think that dispelling these misconceptions is the most important thing here. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill May 7 '12 at 3:03

infor loop you can have these code

N Time

 for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
 {

 }

N+1 Time

 for (int i = 0; i <= N; i++)
 {

 }

And if there isnt any time and you want hanlde it your self you can use this

  for (;;)
     {
           //do something and dont forget use break or return !         
     }

OR

while(x>10)
{    }

and loop in loop is good as Ernest Friedman-Hill said

for (int i = 0; i <=10; i++)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {

    }
}

use 2xTab for visual studio help

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A loop formula can be calculated as

Math.Round (condition - initialization )/increment

In first case its

(N-0)/1 which evaluates to N times

In second case its

(N-1)/1 which evaluates to N-1 times

In third case its

(N-0+1)/1 which evaluates to N+1 times

How would I do if I need to execute statement between m and n times? For instance I want to call one method between m and n times?

then check it in condition

for (int i = m; i < n; i++)
{
    someMethodCall();
}
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