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I have created a public delegate double DynamicFunc(double x);

and now I try to create an instance of it to pass into a component later

    private DynamicFunc f(double x)
    {
        return (return_ => x);
    }

But when I do stuff alike this:

double value = 2 * f(50);

I get: Error Operator '*' cannot be applied to operands of type 'double' and 'DynamicFunc';

Why - what is wrong with my deligate?

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1  
On first glance you seem to have a wrong return type – V4Vendetta May 7 '12 at 7:12

Calling function f with any sort of argument returns a dynamic function, not a value you can use in a math expression..

private DynamicFunc f(double x)
{
    return (return_ => x);
}

double value = 2 * f(50)();

However, have you considered this alternative? That way you need no delegate:

private Func<double> f(double x)
{
    return (() => return x;);
}

double value = 2 * f(50)();
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Try the existing Func delegate :

Func<double, double> f = new Func<double, double>(x => x);
double value = 2 * f(50);
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The f function returns a delegate (DynamicFunc). You need to invoke this delegate by passing it a double argument in order to get the result:

double value = 2 * f(50)(20);
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Because f() is declared to return a delegate and not a double.

You should declare f like this:

private double f(double x)
{
    return (return_ => x);
}

Then in a call:

private double SomeFunc(DyanmicFunc func)
{
    return 2 * func(50);
}

And call it with:

double result = SomeFunc(f);
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