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I'm trying to learn about threads for an assignment for school, and I'm trying to get two threads to empty a collection. The code I came up with so far throws an exception, saying that the collection got modified.

First I had a while loop in the locked code part, but then (of course ;-)) only one thread empties the collection.

My question is, how can I have a loop in which the threads both take turns in emptying the collection?

class Program
{
    private static List<int> containers = new List<int>();

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            containers.Add(i);
        }

        Thread t1 = new Thread(() => { foreach (int container in containers) { GeefContainer(); } });
        t1.Name = "Kraan 1";
        t1.Start();

        Thread t2 = new Thread(() => { foreach (int container in containers) { GeefContainer(); } });
        t2.Name = "Kraan 2";
        t2.Start();

        Console.Write("Press any key to continue...");
        Console.Read();
    }

    static void GeefContainer()
    {
        lock (containers)
        {
            int containerNummer = containers.Count - 1;

            //Container container = containers[containerNummer];

            //Console.Write("Container {0} opgehaald... Overladen", containerNummer);
            Console.WriteLine("Schip: Container {0} gegeven aan {1}", containerNummer, Thread.CurrentThread.Name);

            //Gevaarlijk, want methode aanroepen kan klappen
            containers.RemoveAt(containerNummer);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume you are not allowed to use any of the ThreadSafe collections found in the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace.

You need to gain exclusive access to the containers collection when checking if there are still entries left. Yet, you don't want 1 thread to take exclusive control removing all entries before releasing its lock. Monitor.Pulse can be used to allow other threads waiting to lock the container to 'go first'. Try the following implementation of GeefContainers:

static void GeefContainer()
{
    lock (containers)
    {
        while (containers.Any()) // using linq, similar to: while(container.Count > 0)
        {
            containers.RemoveAt(0); // remove the first element

            // allow other threads to take control
            Monitor.Pulse(containers); // http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.monitor.pulse.aspx
                            // Wait for a pulse from the other thread
                            Monitor.Wait(container);
        }
    }
}

Oh, and remove your looping logic from:

Thread t2 = new Thread(() => { foreach (int container in containers) { GeefContainer(); } });

Simply invoking GeefContainer is enough.

This can be visualized in the following way:

  • Thread 1 gains a lock to 'collections'
  • Thread 2 is blocked since it's waiting for an exclusive lock to 'collections'
  • Thread 1 removes an entry from 'collections'
  • Thread 1 releases it's lock on 'collections' and tries to gain a new exclusive lock
  • Thread 2 gains a lock to 'collections'
  • Thread 2 removes an entry from 'collections'
  • Thread 2 releases it's lock on 'collections' and tries to gain a new exclusive lock
  • Thread 1 gains a lock to 'collections'

etc

share|improve this answer
    
I am very sorry, I was the one who made the mistake. Though, now that i fixed it I noticed that only thread 1 empties the collection. Maybe I should put a sleep somewhere? –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 12:14
    
@ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 - Sorry, my bad. You do need to make the thread wait for a pulse from the other thread. Simply put the Wait statement in the bottom of the loop, see the modified code –  Polity May 7 '12 at 12:56
    
I was reading about threads and the Wait and Pulse Methods on albahari.com/threading/…, and it said the same thing, though I made the mistake of putting Wait() before Pulse(). The way you have it works great. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 13:09
    
...except for one small thing: the last number (number 99) doesn't get displayed. This is because at the moment the thread switching happens, the thread that is switched to has nothing to proces anymore (at least, that's what I think), and so exits the while loop. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 13:56
    
I ended up using your solution, as it eliminates the two loops I had before. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 18:19

The exception you are seeing is being thrown by the enumerator. Enumerators on standard collections have checks to make sure the collection was not modified in the middle of an enumeration operation (via foreach in your case).

Since you want to have your threads alternate removing from the collection then you will need some kind of mechanism that allows the threads to signal each other. We also have to be careful not to access the collection from multiple collections at the same time. Not even the Count property is safe to use without synchronization. The Barrier class makes the signaling really easy. A simple lock will suffice for the synchronization. Here is how I would do this.

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var containers = new List<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            containers.Add(i);
        }

        var barrier = new Barrier(0);

        var t1 = new Thread(() => GeefContainers(containers, barrier));
        t1.Name = "Thread 1";
        t1.Start();

        var t2 = new Thread(() => GeefContainers(containers, barrier));
        t2.Name = "Thread 2";
        t2.Start();

        Console.Write("Press any key to continue...");
        Console.Read();
    }

    private static void GeefContainers(List<int> list, Barrier barrier)
    {
        barrier.AddParticipant();
        while (true)
        {
            lock (list)
            {
                if (list.Count > 0)
                {
                    list.RemoveAt(0);
                    Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.Name + ": Count = " + list.Count.ToString());
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
            barrier.SignalAndWait();
        }
        barrier.RemoveParticipant();
    }

}

The Barrier class basically causes this to happen over and over again.

|----|                 |----|                 |----|
| T1 |-->|         |-->| T1 |-->|         |-->| T1 |
|----|   |         |   |----|   |         |   |----|
         |-->(B)-->|            |-->(B)-->|         
|----|   |         |   |----|   |         |   |----|
| T2 |-->|         |-->| T2 |-->|         |-->| T2 |
|----|                 |----|                 |----|

In the above diagram T1 and T2 represent the remove operations on threads 1 and 2 respectively. (B) represents a call to Barrier.SignalAndWait.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help, this was very insightful! I wanted to give you a Vote Up, but I'm still points short of doing that. I am sorry. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 18:22
    
@ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588: Thanks, but I could care less about the rep so don't sweat it. I just like answering questions and helping people. –  Brian Gideon May 8 '12 at 1:08

First, change your thred definition as follows:

new Thread(() => { while(containers.Count>0) { GeefContainer(); } });

Then, rewrite GeefContainer() as follows to avoid exceptions:

static void GeefContainer()
{
    lock (containers)
    {
        int containerNummer = containers.Count - 1;

        if(containerNummer>=0) 
        {
            //Container container = containers[containerNummer];

            //Console.Write("Container {0} opgehaald... Overladen", containerNummer);
            Console.WriteLine("Schip: Container {0} gegeven aan {1}", containerNummer, Thread.CurrentThread.Name);

            //Gevaarlijk, want methode aanroepen kan klappen
            containers.RemoveAt(containerNummer);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this works! The only thing though; why does it work with a while loop and not with a foreach? Does it have to do with getting an enumerator? –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 9:55
    
Actually i guess if you will try foreach with above GeefContainer() you again won't see exceptions. This is because: after thread1 starts foreach loop with 100 elements in the array, thread2 removes some elements. Then at some point loop continues although array is emptied. Then containerNummer becomes negative and containers.RemoveAt(containerNummer) throws exception. This is what I caught by eye... –  mostar May 7 '12 at 10:03
    
Thank you for the insight and your help! I gave the point to the person with the Wait and Pulse solution, since it did away with the two loops. I wanted to vote you up, but I don't have enough points to do that. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 18:25

What if you modify your threads as follows? That way, both threads should get some time to perform actions on the collection.

Thread t1 = new Thread(() => { 
        while (containers.Count > 0)
        {
            GeefContainer(); 
            Thread.Sleep(150);
        }});
t1.Name = "Kraan 1";
t1.Start();

Thread t2 = new Thread(() => { 
        while (containers.Count > 0)
        {
            GeefContainer(); 
            Thread.Sleep(130);
        }});
t2.Name = "Kraan 2";
t2.Start();
share|improve this answer
    
This is close to what I wanted. It is very similar to the solution above you, but because of the thread.sleep it runs really nicely weaving in and out of the threads. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 9:59
    
Thank you your help! I gave the point to the person with the Wait and Pulse solution, since it did away with the two loops. I wanted to vote you up, but I don't have enough points to do that. –  ImNotANumber.OhWait...0792588 May 7 '12 at 18:28

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