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I'm coming from the .Net MVC background looking to do a project in RoR. Specifically I'm develop a REST api.

I will describe my thinking and hopefully you could steer me in the right direction. My api must support versions and the most robust way to version an api is to duplicate the code for every version. That way fixing issues in one version doesn't effect other versions. When it comes to doing that in .NET MVC, areas are your best friend because source files for each version can nicely be segmented through using areas.

So my question is: In RoR is it possible to change the directory structure so this hierarchy

app/
  controllers
    /v1
      c1_controller.rb
      c2_controller.rb
    /v2
      c1_controller.rb
      c2_controller.rb
  models/
    /v1
      m1.rb
      m2.rb
    /v2
      m1.rb
      m2.rb
  views/
    /v1
      view1.html.erb
      view2.html.erb
    /v3
      view1.html.erb
      view2.html.erb

can be rearranged to this?

app/
  v1/
    controllers/
      c1_controller.rb
      c2_controller.rb
    models/
      m1.rb
      m2.rb
    views/
      view1.html.erb
      view2.html.erb
  v2/
    controllers/
      c1_controller.rb
      c2_controller.rb
    models/
      m1.rb
      m2.rb
    views/
      view1.html.erb
      view2.html.erb
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Can you explain a bit more about what the differences are between versions, whether you would have multiple versions running in the same Rails instance etc? It feels like there might be a neater solution to your problem (various git branches or something) but it's hard to know without more to go on. –  Russell May 9 '12 at 22:41
    
@Russell I'm open to any suggestions. I can not foresee how the newer versions will change. However, I'd like them all to be within the same Rails instance unless considered bad practice. –  Roman May 9 '12 at 22:49
    
I think what I'm getting at is, are they multiple different versions of similar functionality, or are the newer versions just that - newer versions of the same functionality that will eventually replace the older versions (which have to be kept around a while for compatibility)? –  Russell May 9 '12 at 23:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+25

I think you may be trying to solve your problem in slightly the wrong place. If you need to support several versions of your application simultaneously, and be able to make fixes to them independently etc etc, using git for your version control (if you're not already) and creating a separate branch for each version sounds like the way to go to me. (I'm sure you could do similar with Mercurial, SVN etc but Git does seem to be the Rails de facto standard).

Here's a link to some info about branching: http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Basic-Branching-and-Merging

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As far as I understood, question starter wants to keep all versions available online at the same time :) –  forker May 9 '12 at 23:44
    
Yes, you could still do this although in separate rails instances - which I think would be less error-prone in any case! If they are all in the same instance, how do you map routes to controller actions? Every action would need a separate route defining for every version - so many places for something to go wrong. –  Russell May 9 '12 at 23:49
    
@Russell I agree with having each version in a separate rails instance. The other upshot of this approach is that you can have one version down without affecting other versions. That's a major plus. –  Roman May 10 '12 at 4:57
    
@Arman Yes, and it makes it simpler for your clients too if each version runs on a different subdomain, for example, this is the only place they have to specify the version of the service they want to use, rather than as part of the url for every action. –  Russell May 10 '12 at 8:28

Checkout this page, it will give you some insights on directory structure for Rails 3+ projects:

http://edgeapi.rubyonrails.org/classes/Rails/Engine.html

Since Rails 3.0, applications and engines have more flexible path configuration (as opposed to the previous hardcoded path configuration). This means that you are not required to place your controllers at app/controllers, but in any place which you find convenient.

Don't be scared with the fact that it's about Engines, it states in the very beginning: every Rails App is an Engine.

UPDATE: Never had an opportunity to do that myself, but according to that page and this, you should add the following thing into your config/application.rb within class Application < Rails::Application:

config.paths["app/controllers"] << "app/v1/controllers"
config.paths["app/controllers"] << "app/v2/controllers"
config.paths["app/controllers"] << "app/v3/controllers"

config.paths["app/models"] << "app/v1/models"
config.paths["app/models"] << "app/v2/models"
config.paths["app/models"] << "app/v3/models"

config.paths["app/views"] << "app/v1/views"
config.paths["app/views"] << "app/v2/views"
config.paths["app/views"] << "app/v3/views"

Check this project as an example: https://github.com/forker/multiversion

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Hey thanks for that. I'm not sure what exactly to change so the new arrangements are recognised by Rails. That page says: The Application class adds a couple more paths to this set. And as in your Application, all folders under app are automatically added to the load path. If you have an app/observers folder for example, it will be added by default. According to that description the new arrangement should be recognised but my app doesn't think so –  Roman May 7 '12 at 10:33
    
Apparently it won't go deeper than one level from app directory. Try to configure as I've shown in update. –  forker May 7 '12 at 10:48
    
@Arman, any luck with this? –  forker May 8 '12 at 9:46
1  
Yes, sample project proof: github.com/forker/multiversion –  forker May 9 '12 at 23:22
1  
To add: Even though your desired approach does work, the best one would be to maintain all versions in separate Rails application. Then you could mount older versions of your app to the newest one as Engines. –  forker May 9 '12 at 23:33

If you're always on a system that supports symlinks, then it might be simpler to just symlink

app/controllers/v1 -> app/v1/controllers
app/models/v1 -> app/v1/models
app/views/v1 -> app/v1/views

etc. Or alternatively the other way around.

Rails would then read app/controllers/v1/c1_controller.rb as usual and assume it's in the V1 namespace ("class V1::C1Controller").

Remember to make the links relative.

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