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Unmodifiable list in java can be created as:

List<String> unModifiableStringList = Collections.unmodifiableList(myActualModifiableList);

This is fine, but what is the actual runtime type of the list returned by the above function? How can we access that class? Is it even possible?

UPDATE: Actually I need to know at compile time that an unmodifiable list is being modified, Since I have to deal with a lot of lists, some of which are modifiable and others are not. So it is very cumbersome to keep track?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually I need to know at compile time that an unmodifiable list is being modified.

That is not possible.

Or at least, it is not possible without creating a completely different collections interface / class hierarchy. And that's a bad idea because nothing designed to use regular collections would work with it.

I suppose it would be possible to write a static code analyser that could detect this kind of thing ... in some cases ... but that's not strictly "compile time". Besides, I'm not aware of any existing static code analyser that does this "out of the box".


I wonder if there was a reason why they did it like this.

Well none of the ways you might do this really work.

Alternative #1:

 public interface UnmodifiableList<T> {
     public T get(int pos);
     ....
 }

 public interface List<T> extends UnmodifiableList<T> {
     public void add(T elem);
     ....
 }

While static typing can prevent us from using an unmodifiable list where a modifiable one is required, the reverse is not true. Every List is also an UnmodifiableList ... and that doesn't really make sense.

Alternative 2:

 public interface List <T> {
     public T get(int pos);
     public void add(T elem);
     ....
 }

 public interface UnmodifiableList<T> {
     // A marker interface
 }

Now static typing can prevent us from using an modifiable list where an umodifiable one is required, but not the reverse. (That suits your requirement ...) Furthermore, a class that implements UnmodifiableList still inherits the add operation, and there's nothing to stop an application from trying to call it.

In short, static type systems cannot adequately handle this kind of restriction.

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I wonder if there was a reason why they did it like this. :( –  user517491 May 7 '12 at 11:19
2  
As a general rule, you should code to interfaces rather than actual runtime classes. Collections.unmodifiableList is designed, in fact, to force you to code to the interface. –  Louis Wasserman May 7 '12 at 14:55
    
@LouisWasserman - I don't think that's relevant to the OP's followup questions; i.e. the ones I'm answering. –  Stephen C May 7 '12 at 14:59
    
Eh? I was trying to suggest another "reason why they did it like this." –  Louis Wasserman May 7 '12 at 15:00
    
@LouisWasserman - I know you were. But the "it" you are referring to is not the "it" that the OP is asking about in his follow-up question / comment. –  Stephen C May 8 '12 at 3:08

Have you tried unModifiableStringList.getClass().getName()?

To me it gives

java.util.Collections$UnmodifiableRandomAccessList

which, as seen from the source code, is a package-access static inner class of Collections.

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+1 from me..... –  user517491 May 7 '12 at 10:14

See: http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/6-b14/java/util/Collections.java#Collections.unmodifiableList%28java.util.List%29

It's an inner class in Collections:

static class UnmodifiableList<E> extends UnmodifiableCollection<E>
                                 implements List<E>
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It is

static class UnmodifiableList<E> extends UnmodifiableCollection<E>
                      implements List<E>

static class UnmodifiableRandomAccessList<E> extends UnmodifiableList<E>
                                      implements RandomAccess

static class UnmodifiableCollection<E> implements Collection<E>, Serializable

It is inner class of Collections, since Collections is non-instantiable and it is inner class with package visibility, you can not access the class, and it is the implementation hiding in OOP.

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How can I check in my code whether a list is unmodifiable or not? –  user517491 May 7 '12 at 10:16
    
@djaqeel I think you only can check at runtime, but not compile time. And it is not recommend to check at runtime too. –  Pau Kiat Wee May 7 '12 at 10:24

Debug shows that the runtime type is Collections.UnmodifiableRandomAccessList, so it's internal class. Code analysis also shows that it might be Collections.UnmodifiableList.

You shouldn't try to access this class, it's meant to be immutable. Try to use common interface instead, in this case = Collection.

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If you load the Java 6 source code, you'll see that Collections.unmodifiableList returns a static inner class. See Collections.java line 1141

You can use reflection to access it and its fields.

public static <T> List<T> unmodifiableList(List<? extends T> list) {
    return (list instanceof RandomAccess ?
            new UnmodifiableRandomAccessList<T>(list) :
            new UnmodifiableList<T>(list));
}


   static class UnmodifiableList<E> extends UnmodifiableCollection<E>
                      implements List<E> {
        static final long serialVersionUID = -283967356065247728L;
    final List<? extends E> list;

    UnmodifiableList(List<? extends E> list) {
        super(list);
        this.list = list;
    }

// snip...
        }
    public void add(int index, E element) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
        }
// snip...
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Your statement clearly says its still reference of List but it suppress modification of the list.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/Collections.html#unmodifiableList(java.util.List)

If you share unmodifiable list reference you make sure that nobody changes it and allow read only operations.

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