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How can I test if two dictionaries are equal while taking some keys out of consideration. For example,

equal_dicts(
    {'foo':1, 'bar':2, 'x':55, 'y': 77 },
    {'foo':1, 'bar':2, 'x':66, 'z': 88 },
    ignore_keys=('x', 'y', 'z')
)

should return True.

UPD: I'm looking for an efficient, fast solution.

UPD2. I ended up with this code, which appears to be the fastest:

def equal_dicts_1(a, b, ignore_keys):
    ka = set(a).difference(ignore_keys)
    kb = set(b).difference(ignore_keys)
    return ka == kb and all(a[k] == b[k] for k in ka)

Timings: https://gist.github.com/2651872

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
def equal_dicts(d1, d2, ignore_keys):
    d1_filtered = dict((k, v) for k,v in d1.iteritems() if k not in ignore_keys)
    d2_filtered = dict((k, v) for k,v in d2.iteritems() if k not in ignore_keys)
    return d1_filtered == d2_filtered

EDIT: This might be faster and more memory-efficient:

def equal_dicts(d1, d2, ignore_keys):
    ignored = set(ignore_keys)
    for k1, v1 in d1.iteritems():
        if k1 not in ignored and (k1 not in d2 or d2[k1] != v1):
            return False
    for k2, v2 in d2.iteritems():
        if k2 not in ignored and k2 not in d1:
            return False
    return True
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+1 (better than my answer!) Also, if one happens to be using Python 3, you can use a dict comprehension (scroll down a bit) in place of the dict(<generator expression>) idiom. –  huon-dbaupp May 7 '12 at 11:09
    
This is a straightforward solution, but in my situation efficiency matters. –  georg May 7 '12 at 11:31
    
@thg435 - see my updated answer. –  eumiro May 7 '12 at 12:09
    
The second one appears to be buggy: equal_dicts({'a':3,'b':5}, {'a':3,'b':6}, 'b') == False (should be True). –  georg May 8 '12 at 8:52
    
Just testing d[k1] != v1 without the k1 not in d2 check, and catching KeyError is possibly faster (avoids hashing k1 the third time). –  huon-dbaupp May 8 '12 at 9:01
{k: v for k,v in d1.iteritems() if k not in ignore_keys} == {k: v for k,v in d2.iteritems() if k not in ignore_keys}
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This will work in Python 2.7 and 3. –  Chris Morgan May 7 '12 at 11:14
    
Thanks, but see my comment to eumiro's answer. I prefer not to build two expensive memory structures just to compare them. –  georg May 7 '12 at 11:32
    
then you can write the loop out manually , but you might find the comprehension faster anyway because of C implementation –  wim May 7 '12 at 12:32
def compare_dict(d1, d2, ignore):
    for k in d1:
        if k in ignore:
            continue
        try:
            if d1[k] != d2[k]:
                return False
        except KeyError:
            return False
    return True

Comment edit: You can do something like compare_dict(d1, d2, ignore) and compare_dict(d2, d1, ignore) or duplicate the for

def compare_dict(d1, d2, ignore):
    ignore = set(ignore)
    for k in d1:
        if k in ignore:
            continue
        try:
            if d1[k] != d2[k]:
                return False
        except KeyError:
            return False

    for k in d2:
        if k in ignore:
            continue
        try:
            if d1[k] != d2[k]:
                return False
        except KeyError:
            return False
    return True

Whatever is faster and cleaner! Update: cast set(ignore)

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1  
Thanks, but I don't think this will work when d2 has extra keys. –  georg May 7 '12 at 11:33

Very very crudely, you could just delete any ignored keys and compare those dictionaries:

def equal_dicts(d1, d2, ignore_keys=()):
    d1_, d2_ = d1.copy(), d2.copy()
    for k in ignore_keys:
        try:
            del d1_[k]
        except KeyError: 
            pass
        try:
            del d2_[k]
        except KeyError: 
            pass

    return d1_ == d2_

(Note that we don't need a deep copy here, we just need to avoid modifying d1 and d2.)

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1  
crude indeed )))) –  georg May 7 '12 at 11:36

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