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I'm looking for the best way to read data from an stdin pipe in C programming.

Problem : I need to seek on this data, ie I need to read data from the start of the stream after reading some data at the end of this same stream.

Small use case : gunzip -c 4GbDataFile.gz | myprogram

Another one :

  1. On local host : nc -l -p 1234 | myprogram
  2. On remote host : gunzip -c 4GbDataFile.gz | nc -q 0 theotherhost 1234

I know that reading from fifo can be done only once. So, at the moment :

  • I slurp everything from stdin to memory and work from this allocated memory.

It's ugly, but it works. An evident issue is that if someone sends a huge (or a continuous) stream to my app, I'll end with a big allocated memory chunk or I'll run out of memory. (Think about an 8Gb file)

What I thought next :

  • I set a size limit (maybe user-defined) of that memory chunk. Once I've read this much data from stdin :
    1. Either I stop here : "Errr. Out of memory, bazinga. Forget it." style.
    2. Either I start dumping what I am reading to a file and work from this file once all data is read.

But then, what is the point? I can not find out the origin of the data that I am reading. If this is a local 8Gb file, I'll be dumping it to another 8Gb file on the same system.

So, my question is :

How do you read efficiently a lot of data from an stdinpipe when you have to seek back and forth in it?

Thanks in advance for your answers.

Edit :

My program needs to read metadata somewhere (depending of the file format) in the given file, so that maybe at the end of the stream. Then it may read back other data at the start of the stream, then at another place etc. In short : it needs to have access to any bytes of the data.

An example would be to read data of an archive file without knowing the file format before starting to read from stdin: I need to check the archive metadata, find archive files names and offsets etc.

So I'll make a local copy of stdin content and work from it. Thanks everyone for your inputs ;)

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ITYM myprogram < 4GbDataFile. Currently, cat 4GbDataFile > myprogram overwrites your program binary. And when you replace '>' with a pipe you have a useless use of cat. –  Jens May 7 '12 at 11:32
    
Thanks, fixed the typo, added a more useful use of cat. –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 11:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The data structure in your 4GbDataFile just doesn't lend itself to what you want to do. Think outside the box. Don't hammer your program into something it shouldn't even attempt. Try to fix the input format where it is generated so you don't need to seek back 4 GB.

In case you do like hammering: 4GB of in-core memory is pretty expensive. Instead, save the data read from stdin in a file, then open the file (or mmap it) and seek to your heart's content.

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I can not fix the input format as it can be anything (I edited my question and added an example of program work at the end). Does not mmaping a 4GB file result in a 4GB in-core memory chunk? Saving the data read into a file and seeking in it maybe more appropriate, but if it is a local file it's just duplicating the original file and work on the copy rather than the original... –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 11:56
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You can't have your pie and eat it. Seeking on pipes is impossible. If you insist on it, you'll have to turn the unseekable data into seekable (by saving a copy). When mmapping, don't map the whole data, just mmap the blocks where you want to seek to, calculated from the seek offset. –  Jens May 7 '12 at 13:24
    
Ok thanks, I'll make a copy and warn the user about not piping huge local files and prefer to give them as fd to avoid duplicating content. –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 13:43

You need to get your requirements clear. If you need to seek() then obviously you can't take input from stdin. If you need to seek() then you should take input file name as argument.

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I mentioned that, at the moment, it works by slurping all to memory and doing the work here. I suppose it will works too when using a temporary file. I know that I can't seek on a fifo, I'm looking for an elegant (more than my slurping) workaround ;) –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 11:30
    
I supposed it will works to when using a temporary file. -- but why would you do that, when you are just duplicating a file content? What your program does? –  tuxuday May 7 '12 at 11:33
    
My program needs to read metadata somewhere (depending of the file format) in the given file, so that maybe at the end of the stream. Then it may read back other data at the start of the stream, then at another place etc. In short, it needs to have access to any bytes of the data. An example would be to read data of an archive file without knowing the file format : I need to check the archive metadata, find archive files names and offsets etc. –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 11:39
    
So, if your program works on files then treat them as files, i.e. seek and read them from any location. –  Maxim Yegorushkin May 7 '12 at 11:45
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Except that stdin is not a normal file, isn't it? I can't seek on or read from it as usual. That's why I'm currently mapping data read from stdin to memory (or to a file, but if the $user just cat a local file to my program, I'll be duplicating the file rather than working on the original one...). That works, what i'm looking for is an elegant way to fallback if the $user sends me a lot of data. –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 12:01

I think you should read the infamous Useless Use of Cat Award.

TL;DR: change cat 4gbfile | yourprogram to yourprogram < 4gbfile.

If you really insist on having it work with data from a pipe, you'll have to store it in a temporary file at startup then replace file descriptor 0 with a copy of the fd for the temp file, using dup2.

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That is what I want : work with data from a pipe. (Edited my question to remove "Useless Use of Cat", it was just meant to be an example by the way... otherwise I would have used what you and @Jens recommended) –  Lenain May 7 '12 at 12:26

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